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BA check-in worker, 69, who won a landmark legal battle suing BA

Devout Christian Nadia Eweida won a religious discrimination claim against BA in the European Court of Human Rights in 2013 after being sent home for wearing a silver crucifix around her neck

A British Airways check-in worker who won a landmark legal battle over wearing a crucifix to work claims she was victimised and harassed for whistleblowing.

Devout Christian Nadia Eweida won a religious discrimination claim against BA in the European Court of Human Rights in 2013 after being sent home for wearing a silver crucifix around her neck. 

In a personal statement for her fresh legal action today she said that her victory against the airline at the ECHR caused a continuing campaign against her. 

The 69-year-old is now alleging in a new employment tribunal claim that as punishment for whistleblowing, airline managers singled her out when she returned to work in 2007.

She argued she was ‘brow beaten’ by airline bosses who ‘forced’ her to work when she was in pain from glaucoma and suffered detrimental’ health problems including nose bleeds because of her treatment.

Ms Eweida said she was denied a break after experiencing strain on her eyes in the wake of an operation and told to cover a flight gate.

When she refused she was given a written warning by management.

BA strongly denies the allegations.

Ms Eweida, in her submission to Watford Employment Tribunal, said: ‘I suffer from glaucoma and had selective laser trabeculoplasy surgery in 2013 and required a second glaucoma operation in 2014.’

The 69-year-old is now alleging in a new employment tribunal claim that as punishment for whistleblowing, airline managers singled her out when she returned to work in 2007.

The 69-year-old is now alleging in a new employment tribunal claim that as punishment for whistleblowing, airline managers singled her out when she returned to work in 2007.

Ms Eweida said of a particular incident: ‘I had pain in my eyes and asked for a break. I was brow beaten and forced to work. 

‘On the 14 March 2017, I received an inappropriate informal warning as a disciplinary sanction from the respondent team.

‘I suffered nose bleeds and I was made feel less than nothing. A nobody and broken and worthless. I contacted Safe Call and reported this to them.

‘I took union advice and took out a grievance and was told that I had to wait for the outcome before I could take it any further. My grievance failed – I was depressed and subdued.’

She continued: ‘At the end of my tether decided to take legal advice and contacted Bindmanns and it was only then was I informed on the time limits – the union told me I was out of time.

‘The whole proceedings from 2006 to date has been traumatic and harrowing. The Respondent’s failure in their duty of care.

‘I have suffered health detrimental nose bleeds throughout at work and high blood pressure at work.’

A further uniform policy introduced in July 2017 required female staff to tuck their cravat in their blouse, meaning Ms Eweida had to wear her crucifix on top of her cravat – a move she claimed was designed to affect her.

BA said the time limit of bringing this case has passed.

But Ms Eweida of Twickenham, claims there was ‘good reason’ for this because she wanted to maintain a positive relationship with her employer.

The hearing continues. 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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