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BBC’s director-general Tim Davie arrives for first day as he threatens to AXE ‘left-wing’ comedies

BBC’s new director-general Tim Davie arrives for his first day as he promises radical shake up of biased ‘left-wing’ comedies – while executives look at replacing licence fee with special income tax

  • Tim Davie takes over as new BBC director-general from outgoing Lord Tony Hall
  • He will look for a shake-up of the BBC’s ‘left-wing biased comedies’, say reports
  • Top executives will also look at a ‘Swedish-style’ model of funding for the BBC

BBC’s new director-general Tim Davie today arrived at work for his first day in his new role, as reports suggest he will make a radical shake-up of the broadcaster’s ‘left-wing biased comedies’, while top executives look at a new model of funding.

The former chief executive of BBC Studios, the corporation’s commercial production and distribution arm, is expected to set out his plans for the broadcaster in the coming week, with impartiality a key focus.

Mr Davie reportedly wants a radical overhaul of the broadcaster’s comedy output in the coming months, over fears it is seen as is seen as ‘too one-sided’, reports The Telegraph.

Shows such as BBC Two’s satirical comedy The Mash Report and The Now Show on Radio 4 and Have I Got News For You have previously been criticised.

BBC’s new director-general Tim Davie today arrived at work for his first day in his new role, as reports suggest he will make a radical shake-up of the broadcaster’s ‘left-wing biased comedies’, while top executives look at a new model of funding

Mr Davie reportedly wants a radical overhaul of the broadcaster's comedy output in the coming months, over fears it is seen as is seen as 'too one-sided', reports the Telegraph

Mr Davie reportedly wants a radical overhaul of the broadcaster’s comedy output in the coming months, over fears it is seen as is seen as ‘too one-sided’, reports the Telegraph

BBC broadcaster Andrew Neil in 2018 described the former as a ‘self satisfied, self adulatory, unchallenged Left-wing propaganda,’ while he hit out at as Now Show on Radio 4 was ‘contrived ideological commentary’.

Meanwhile, top BBC executives will also look at replacing the traditional licence fee system with a special income tax, according to reports in The Guardian today.

Such a system is currently used in Sweden to fund all of its public service broadcasting. 

People pay a maximum of £113 (1,300 SeK) a year for the service, compared to the £157-a-year for the BBC, while the tax is a sliding scale with those with less money paying less – unlike the BBC’s flat rate system.

Mr Davie starts his new role today, taking over from Lord Tony Hall as the BBC’s director-general.

Lord Hall’s exit after seven years in the role comes amid a turbulent time for the BBC.

Lord Hall's exit after seven years in the role comes amid a turbulent time for the BBC

Lord Hall’s exit after seven years in the role comes amid a turbulent time for the BBC

The broadcaster faces scrutiny over equal pay, diversity, free TV licences for the over-75s and competition from streaming services such as Netflix, as well as the on-going coronavirus crisis.

Davie was acting director-general for four months following George Entwistle’s resignation in November 2012 before Lord Hall’s appointment, and previously served as the corporation’s head of audio.

Before joining the BBC in 2005, he worked in marketing.

Davie starts as the BBC hit controversy over the decision to play orchestral versions of Rule, Britannia! and Land Of Hope And Glory at the Last Night Of The Proms.

The BBC is also expecting to receive a report into the use of social media by its staff, including presenters, written by Richard Sambrook.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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