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Boy, 10, saves six-year-old sister from choking on Lego brick by performing Heimlich manoeuvre

Boy, 10, saves his six-year-old sister from choking on Lego brick by performing Heimlich manoeuvre after being taught how to do it at school

  • Harrison Walmsley, ten, recalled a first-aid technique he had learned at school
  • He carried out the Heimlich manoeuvre on sister Eva, six, who was choking 
  • She had choked on a lego brick and burst into her brother’s room red in the face  

It was a moment which would strike fear into the hearts of most adults.

But ten-year-old Harrison Walmsley tried not to panic when he saw his sister Eva, six, choking on a Lego brick.

Instead he recalled a first-aid technique he learned at school before lockdown – and carried out the Heimlich manoeuvre.

Ten-year-old Harrison Walmsley (left) tried not to panic when he saw his sister Eva, six, (right) choking on a Lego brick

He grabbed Eva from behind and squeezed her abdomen until she was able to spit out the brick – saving her life. 

The quick-thinking schoolboy leapt into action after Eva burst into his bedroom going red in the face.

By the time their horrified parents arrived minutes later she was able to breathe again. 

Harrison recalled a first-aid technique he learned at school before lockdown – and carried out the Heimlich manoeuvre

Harrison recalled a first-aid technique he learned at school before lockdown – and carried out the Heimlich manoeuvre

Now Harrison has been hailed a hero – and his parents have told him that Father Christmas is going to be extra-generous this year.

His father Brian said: ‘It was a split-second decision that saved her life – I’m bursting with pride with how Harrison acted.

‘He’s amazingly calm and managed to think about what he needed to do without panicking.’

The children were playing in their rooms at their home in Blackburn, when Harrison began shouting: ‘Mum! Dad! Quick, Eva is choking!’ 

Harrison said: ‘It was terrifying when I had to put the knowledge I’d learned into action but I’m happy I was able to do it. I just wanted Eva to be all right and be safe.’ 

By performing abdominal thrusts, Harrison was able to clear the plastic brick from her throat and enable her to breathe again by the time her parents reached his room.

He added: ‘I knew what I needed to do. She was choking and I had to act.’ 

Mr Walmsley, 37, said it could have easily ended in tragedy. 

‘She was completely red in the face and crying – it was terrifying. She was shaking and crying and he was just so flustered – it was just such a big commotion.

‘We checked if she was OK and it was clear she wasn’t choking any more but we took her to the hospital anyway. 

Thankfully everything was all right and the worst was behind us. 

But in that moment it was just terrifying – seeing your child like that is every parent’s worst nightmare.’ 

The quick-thinking schoolboy leapt into action after his sister burst into his bedroom going red in the face

The quick-thinking schoolboy leapt into action after his sister burst into his bedroom going red in the face

Harrison learned about the life-saving technique at his school in nearby Osbaldeston shortly before pupils were sent home at the start of the pandemic.

His father said: ‘I’m so grateful. It’s so easy for a kid to choke and it’s something that can just happen in the blink of an eye.

‘But it’s fantastic that the school commissioned the first-aid training and even more remarkable that Harrison remembered it all these months on. 

‘It’s so important to learn how to do these things as you can’t predict when something like this will happen – you just need to be ready.’

Harrison’s headteacher at St Mary’s School, Maria Coulthard, said: ‘Harrison’s quick-thinking and ability to remain calm in a potentially life-threatening situation by putting into practice what he’d learned in school has made myself and the whole school community so proud.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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