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Burglaries and car thefts DOUBLE in Queens community hit hardest by coronavirus

Burglaries and car thefts DOUBLE in Queens community hit hardest by coronavirus – while major crime rate across NYC plummets 33% during lockdown

  • Major crimes in NYC have dropped 33 percent during the two weeks since stay-at-home orders went into effect, NYPD data shows 
  • But in a few poorer minority communities – which are known to have higher rates of COVID-19 infections on average – lesser crimes are actually on the rise
  • In southeast Queens, where the majority of the city’s cases have been reported, there’s been a 50 percent increase in burglaries and car thefts  
  • In East and Central Harlem, burglaries are up 18 percent 

As major crime has plummeted in New York City during the first two weeks under strict stay-at-home orders, some neighborhoods hit hardest by coronavirus are seeing a spike in burglaries and car thefts. 

Across all five boroughs the number of major crimes cases – which range from murder and felony assault to grand larceny – has dropped 33 percent since lockdown measures were put in place on March 22, according to a Market Watch analysis of the NYPD’s weekly crime statistics. 

But in a few poorer minority communities – which are known to have higher rates of COVID-19 infections on average – the decrease in major crimes has been more muted, while lesser crimes are actually on the rise.  

In southeast Queens, where the majority of the city’s cases have been reported, there’s been a 50 percent increase in burglaries and car thefts over the past two weeks. Major crimes there have fallen 25 percent there. 

In East and Central Harlem, burglaries are up 18 percent. 

Major crime in New York City has plummeted during the first two weeks under strict stay-at-home orders, but statistics show some neighborhoods hit hardest by coronavirus are seeing a spike in burglaries and car thefts. Pictured: Officers detain a woman outside the Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens on March 30

Meanwhile, Manhattan South has seen the largest drop in major crime with 54 percent fewer incidents compared to the two weeks before the lockdown, which turned the area into a ghost town as businesses and office buildings shuttered and tourism dried up.   

Midtown North in particular saw an 80 percent decrease in major crimes as Times Square emptied out. 

The changes in crime rates appear to be directly linked to the number of coronavirus cases reported in each area – with poorer minority and immigrant communities taking the brunt of the outbreak.  

As of Thursday evening, there were more than 87,700 confirmed infections across the Big Apple and 4,778 deaths.  

Earlier this week Mayor Bill de Blasio and city health officials released preliminary data which showed that two-thirds of people who’ve died of COVID-19 were black or Latino, despite accounting for only half of the city’s population.

Donovan Richards, a Democratic city councilman from Queens and chair of the council’s public safety committee, told Market Watch that higher rates of disease and surging unemployment in neighborhoods with higher rates of poverty is a ‘recipe for disaster’. 

‘Crimes of poverty are certainly going to increase,’ he said.  

In southeast Queens (pictured), where the majority of the city's COVID-19 cases have been reported, there's been a 50 percent increase in burglaries and car thefts

In southeast Queens (pictured), where the majority of the city’s COVID-19 cases have been reported, there’s been a 50 percent increase in burglaries and car thefts

Crime rates have dropped 80 percent in Midtown North since the lockdown began. Pictured: An NYPD officer stands in an empty Times Square on March 28

Crime rates have dropped 80 percent in Midtown North since the lockdown began. Pictured: An NYPD officer stands in an empty Times Square on March 28

As of Thursday evening, there were more than 87,700 confirmed COVID-19 infections in New York City and 4,778 deaths

As of Thursday evening, there were more than 87,700 confirmed COVID-19 infections in New York City and 4,778 deaths

Preliminary data released earlier this week showed that two-thirds of people who've died of COVID-19 in New York City were black or Latino, despite accounting for only half of the city's population

Preliminary data released earlier this week showed that two-thirds of people who’ve died of COVID-19 in New York City were black or Latino, despite accounting for only half of the city’s population

Overall, however, city officials have expressed optimism over the current crime situation in the Big Apple. 

In a public briefing to NYPD officers last week, Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said: ‘Crime has dropped off the face of the map really since the social distancing went into effect.’

‘As hard as EMS is working on a lot of fronts, our radio calls are actually down, the ones that get funneled to the NYPD.’ 

It comes as the nation’s largest police force faces its own crisis due to the outbreak, with more and more staff members falling ill each day. 

More than 2,600 civilian employees and uniformed officers within the NYPD have tested positive for COVID-19 as of Thursday – and nearly 20 percent of the force has been calling out sick.  

New York City deaths (63% reporting)
Ethnicity Percentage of deaths Percentage of population   
Hispanic 34% 29%   
Black   28%  22%   
White   27%  32%   
Asian   7%  14%   



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk