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Cancer stricken mum fears Australia’s brainless border closures could ruin her chances of survival

A cancer-stricken mother battling the deadly disease for the second time in nine years fears Australia’s border closures could ruin her chances of survival.

Emma Gorrick, from Sydney’s northern beaches, beat breast cancer for the first time after she was diagnosed in 2011 at the age of 25. 

A double mastectomy and two children later, the now 34-year-old is fighting for her life again after metastatic breast cancer formed in her liver and in her bones.

While the four-year survival rate for metastatic, or stage four, breast cancer sits at 22 per cent worldwide, cutting-edge treatments are available in Japan, Germany and Mexico.

Due to Australia’s COVID-19 border closures, the mother-of-two has been cut off from potentially life-saving remedies only offered overseas. 

Pictured: Emma Gorrick, 34, with her husband Dave, 38, and children Mya, age four, and Ryan, age two

Mrs Gorrick (pictured with her husband) beat breast cancer for the first time after she was diagnosed in 2011 at the age of 25

Mrs Gorrick (pictured with her husband) beat breast cancer for the first time after she was diagnosed in 2011 at the age of 25

Mr Gorrick told Daily Mail Australia that if it wasn't for the border closures, Emma Gorrick (pictured) 'definitely' would have travelled seeking medical care

Mr Gorrick told Daily Mail Australia that if it wasn’t for the border closures, Emma Gorrick (pictured) ‘definitely’ would have travelled seeking medical care

Her husband David Gorrick, 38, told Daily Mail Australia that if it wasn’t for the border closures, the family ‘definitely’ would have travelled seeking medical care. 

‘The treatments available overseas are more advanced than us, but we haven’t been able to access those due to the pandemic,’ he said.

‘If it wasn’t for that, Em definitely would have gotten on a plane. There’s a lot of research to suggest the treatments would work.’

Determined to do everything in their power to elongate her life, the couple saw no other option but to recreate the centre in their home when flights were grounded. 

‘We’ve spent about $100,000 on equipment that is used at a cancer centre in Mexico and set it all up in our garage as a treatment hub,’ he said. 

The family spend $100,000 on machines to treat Mrs Gorrick in their garage at home

The family spend $100,000 on machines to treat Mrs Gorrick in their garage at home

The couple have a daughter named Mya (pictured looking through the family's hyperbaric chamber)

Ryan (pictured looking through the family's hyperbaric chamber) is two years' old

Pictured: The couple’s daughter, Mya, and son, Ryan, looking through the family’s hyperbaric chamber in their garage

'We've got an infrared sauna, hyperbaric chamber and a hypothermia chamber, and Em gets two Vitamin C infusions a week that cost about $370 each,' Mr Gorrick said.

‘We’ve got an infrared sauna, hyperbaric chamber and a hypothermia chamber, and Em gets two Vitamin C infusions a week that cost about $370 each,’ Mr Gorrick said.

‘We’ve got an infrared sauna, hyperbaric chamber and a hypothermia chamber, and Em gets two Vitamin C infusions a week that cost about $370 each.’

Along with frequent treatments at the makeshift home centre, Mrs Gorrick continues to see her oncologists and take estrogen blockers to slow the cancer down.

While Mr Gorrick struggled with his wife’s second diagnosis in early 2020, he also got the heartbreaking news that his mother, who lives in Queensland, is also fighting breast cancer.    

Along with frequent treatments at the makeshift home centre, Mrs Gorrick continues to see her oncologists and take estrogen blockers to slow the cancer down

Along with frequent treatments at the makeshift home centre, Mrs Gorrick continues to see her oncologists and take estrogen blockers to slow the cancer down

Despite the pain, Mrs Gorrick has remained positive and says she is 'thankful of everything I'm learning'

Despite the pain, Mrs Gorrick has remained positive and says she is ‘thankful of everything I’m learning’

Pictured: Mrs Gorrick in 2011 while she battled breast cancer for the first time, at the age of 25

Pictured: Mrs Gorrick in 2011 while she battled breast cancer for the first time, at the age of 25

Because of the Sunshine State’s border closures, he hasn’t seen his mother since he found out she was sick. 

‘It’s been a bit of a bad year,’ he said. 

‘In a scenario like this, we need as much support as we can get. My family haven’t been able to see Em and support her by giving her cuddles and that sort of thing, and it does make a difference.’ 

During the height of the pandemic in March, Mr Gorrick said it was difficult to leave the house for fear that his sick wife would contract coronavirus.  

'We really want to stay positive because it helps us and Em. It's probably about 50/50 at the moment, but we stay as positive as we can,' Mr Gorrick said

‘We really want to stay positive because it helps us and Em. It’s probably about 50/50 at the moment, but we stay as positive as we can,’ Mr Gorrick said

During the height of the pandemic in March, Mr Gorrick said it was difficult to leave the house for fear that his sick wife would contract coronavirus

During the height of the pandemic in March, Mr Gorrick said it was difficult to leave the house for fear that his sick wife would contract coronavirus

While Mr Gorrick struggled with his wife's second diagnosis in early 2020, he also got the heartbreaking news that his mother, who lives in Queensland, is also fighting breast cancer

While Mr Gorrick struggled with his wife’s second diagnosis in early 2020, he also got the heartbreaking news that his mother, who lives in Queensland, is also fighting breast cancer

‘We did this all nine years ago when she first had cancer, but this time there’s a pandemic.’ 

‘At one stage I had to shower after each trip outside to make sure she wouldn’t get it, and Em didn’t leave the house at all.’

When asked about his wife’s chance of survival, Mr Gorrick hesitated.

‘We really want to stay positive because it helps us and Em. It’s probably about 50/50 at the moment, but we stay as positive as we can.’ 

Mrs Gorrick documents her painful experience with stage four cancer on an Instagram page called The Journey of Healing Em

Mrs Gorrick documents her painful experience with stage four cancer on an Instagram page called The Journey of Healing Em

Mrs Gorrick documents her painful experience with stage four cancer on an Instagram page called The Journey of Healing Em. 

In a post from August 30, she wrote about a recent evening when she was in so much pain following a medical procedure that her daughter Mya, age four, broke down.

‘Mya came home from kindy, saw me how I was not able to move and she was a mess crying all night asking to look after mamma.’ 

Despite the pain, Mrs Gorrick has remained positive and says she is ‘thankful of everything I’m learning along the way. There’s a silver lining to everything.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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