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Charity supported by Princess Diana ‘used prostitutes’


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  • Mines Advisory Group admits it had failed to ‘sufficiently’ investigate allegations
  • Reported that staff working in the Congo were regularly paying women for sex
  • Diana worked with charity before she died and now Harry continues her efforts

A landmine charity supported by Princess Diana and Prince Harry was last night facing accusations that its staff in Africa had been using prostitutes habitually.

Mines Advisory Group (Mag) admitted that it had failed to ‘sufficiently’ investigate allegations that some staff working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) were regularly paying women for sex.

Princess Diana, who famously walked through a minefield in Angola to highlight the dangers of landmines, worked with the charity in the months before her death in 1997. Her work is being continued by her son Harry.

The allegations against the charity were raised by an anonymous whistleblower.

He was reported in The Sunday Times to have made allegations against several individuals, but commented: ‘I was always surprised more wasn’t done to stop this behaviour.’ 

Mines Advisory Group (Mag), supported by Princess Diana, is facing accusations that its staff in Africa had been using prostitutes habitually. Above, the late Princess of Wales in 1997 visiting a minefield charity Halo Trust (who are not accused of any misconduct) was clearing in Angola

In a statement, Mag said: ‘In relation to generic allegations of habitual use of prostitutes by Mag staff in DRC it would seem these were not sufficiently followed up at the time as they should have been, and we are very sorry about this.’ 

A spokesman added that the charity’s rules and procedures had since been tightened up. 

Diana worked with Mag months before her death in 1997, now Prince Harry continues his mother's work. Above, Harry at International Mine Awareness Day in April last year

Diana worked with Mag months before her death in 1997, now Prince Harry continues his mother’s work. Above, Harry at International Mine Awareness Day in April last year

Other charities revealed new figures for sexual abuse and harassment ahead of reports they are preparing to submit to International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt today.

The claims include 20 incidents of sexual harassment and two involving safeguarding at Action Aid, while Water Aid said that it had dismissed four staff members for sexually harassing colleagues.

Earlier, the Red Cross admitted 21 staff members had been either sacked or quit over sexual misconduct allegations.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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