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Cornwall’s landscape takes flight in surreal 360 degree footage

At first glance, this surreal panoramic footage of land and sea seems to defy the laws of physics.

But what appears to be great swathes of coastline laughing in the face of gravity is, in fact, Cornwall.

The clip, created by videographer Paul Parker, shows the southwestern tip of England in all its glory – from harbour villages and fields to sparkling blue waters – but he’s literally given it a new spin.

He made it by stitching images from a drone into 360-degree panoramas. And among the places featured are St Ives, Halsetown and St Michael’s Mount in Penzance.

Mr Parker (known on Vimeo as Parker Paul) told MailOnline: ‘I’m an After Effects artist – basically, someone who makes motion graphics and video effects using Adobe After Effects. I was recently learning how to create 360-degree panoramas using a drone, which involves taking hundreds of pictures and then stitching them together. 

‘When it came to the stitching part, I made a serious error in the process and the result was a beautifully surreal landscape with what looked like an interdimensional portal running through it. 

This stunning footage shows the landscape of Cornwall as a warped, and mesmerising, gravity-defying panorama. (Pictured is Halsetown)

Titled, All Sight, the 1minute 21 second clip was created by videographer Paul Parker, from St Ives (pictured), in Cornwall

Titled, All Sight, the 1minute 21 second clip was created by videographer Paul Parker, from St Ives (pictured), in Cornwall

'I was recently learning how to create 360-degree panoramas using a drone, which involves taking hundreds of pictures and then stitching them together. When it came to the stitching part, I made a serious error in the process and the result was a beautifully surreal landscape with what looked like an interdimensional portal running through it,' said Mr Parker

‘I was recently learning how to create 360-degree panoramas using a drone, which involves taking hundreds of pictures and then stitching them together. When it came to the stitching part, I made a serious error in the process and the result was a beautifully surreal landscape with what looked like an interdimensional portal running through it,’ said Mr Parker

‘I thought it would look breathtaking if you could actually fly through a landscape like that. (There are 360 videocameras that can do that, but the footage warps around at the poles of the image in an unnatural and nauseating way – because the human brain can’t make sense of it properly.)

‘So, I broke down the warped panoramic photos into layers, offset them in 3D space (a bit like a kid’s pop-up book) and had a 3D virtual camera fly through them. The end result is something the human brain can comfortably process.’

One viewer who saw the 1 minute 21 second video, titled All Sight, commented: ‘Unique perspective. Finding myself repeatedly drawn back to watch and lamenting the lack of a wall-sized screen.’

Among Mr Parker’s other works is Seagulls Skytrails, which shows a timelapse of the birds surfing the winds, outside the window of his home in St Ives, Cornwall. 

Thinking it would be great if you could fly through such a vista, Mr Parker used his Adobe After Effects skills to create the work

Thinking it would be great if you could fly through such a vista, Mr Parker used his Adobe After Effects skills to create the work

Speaking of his creation, Mr Parker told MailOnline: 'The end result is something the human brain can comfortably process'

Speaking of his creation, Mr Parker told MailOnline: ‘The end result is something the human brain can comfortably process’

As well as being used to create artistic works such as the ones seen here, drone usage is growing across an array of applications.

They range in size from something that could slip into your pocket right up to the behemoth weaponry used by militaries around the world.

And they are not only in the skies – they can also be found driving on the ground, inspecting sub-sea pipelines, crawling into tight gaps too dangerous for humans or even rocketing off to outer space. 

They are used by emergency services, including search and rescue and tackling fires, through to innovations in agriculture, construction, humanitarian aid, wildlife preservation and personal security.

It is predicted that drones will spawn a £70billion ($100bn) industry by 2020.

E-commerce, package and fast food delivery have yet to fully develop in this sector but companies such as Google and Amazon are investing heavily in the application of drones.

In a surreal reversal of logic, part of the sky appears to become a planet, surrounded by 'green landscape' space. As well as being used to create artistic works such as the ones seen here, drone usage is growing across an array of applications

In a surreal reversal of logic, part of the sky appears to become a planet, surrounded by ‘green landscape’ space. As well as being used to create artistic works such as the ones seen here, drone usage is growing across an array of applications

One viewer who saw the clip commented: 'Unique perspective. Finding myself repeatedly drawn back to watch and lamenting the lack of a wall-sized screen'

One viewer who saw the clip commented: ‘Unique perspective. Finding myself repeatedly drawn back to watch and lamenting the lack of a wall-sized screen’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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