News, Culture & Society

David Warner insists there will NEVER be another player like him – as he remembers Phil Hughes

David Warner insists there will NEVER be another batsman like him as he opens up on his reaction to great mate Phil Hughes’ tragic death – and why he stopped drinking for two years

  • David Warner can’t see another international cricketer following his career path
  • Close mate Phil Hughes still remains in Warner’s thoughts after tragic death
  • Warner is expected to play in his 100th career Test on Boxing Day at the MCG 

Australian cricketer David Warner doesn’t believe there will ever be another international player of his vintage – as he also took time to reflect on the tragic death of close mate Phil Hughes.

Warner, 36, made his international debut in January of 2009 at the MCG in a T20 match versus South Africa – and a star was born.

He plundered 89 from just 43 balls – and then set about becoming a dominant force in all three forms of the sport.

Pointing to the relentless schedule of world cricket these days, Warner can’t see an up and coming batsman following his unique career path anytime soon.

‘There might be the odd one that jumps out,’ he said.

Australian cricketer David Warner doesn’t believe there will ever be another batsman who dominates all three forms of the sport like he has

The father of three will play his 100th career Test match at the MCG on Boxing Day (pictured, with wife Candice)

The father of three will play his 100th career Test match at the MCG on Boxing Day (pictured, with wife Candice)

‘But I don’t think you’re going to see a five-10 year career cricketer playing all three forms. I just don’t think it’s going to happen.’

Speaking ahead of his 100th test on Boxing Day in Melbourne, the father of three paid tribute to Hughes, who died in November of 2014 after he was hit in the neck by a bouncer during a Sheffield Shield match at the SCG.

The blow caused a vertebral artery dissection which led to a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Hughes was just 25.

Not long after his close friend’s death, Warner attempted a net session at the back of Adelaide Oval – but couldn’t do it.

Overcome by grief, Warner then made back-to-back hundreds against India in emotional scenes.

As he reflected on his career, Warner revealed he played on instinct after the death of close mate Phil Hughes in 2014 (pictured in 2015, pointing to the sky as a tribute to his mate)

As he reflected on his career, Warner revealed he played on instinct after the death of close mate Phil Hughes in 2014 (pictured in 2015, pointing to the sky as a tribute to his mate)

Hughes died in November of 2014 after he was hit in the neck by a bouncer during a Sheffield Shield match at the SCG. He was just 25

Hughes died in November of 2014 after he was hit in the neck by a bouncer during a Sheffield Shield match at the SCG. He was just 25

‘I didn’t put a value on my wicket. I just went out there and saw the ball and reacted,’ he told News Corp.

‘I was fiery that Test match. I felt like at that stage we (as cricketers) didn’t deserve to be out there. It was very, very difficult. 

‘I know Hughesy would have wanted us to go back out there. That was the type of person he was. He just cared about everyone else.’

Warner also revealed he gave up alcohol for two years as he felt it was adding to his negative mindset at the time.

‘My wife was pregnant at the time so that was the reason why [he gave up alcohol], but I just kept going after that,’ he revealed.

The transformation saw Warner nicknamed ‘The Reverend’ by teammates as he looked to move on from the ‘attack dog’ moniker following his highly aggressive early approach to international cricket. 

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



Find local lawyers and law firms at USAttorneys.com