News, Culture & Society

Facebook bans Renaissance-style art for showing breasts

  • Artwork on a Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival advert contained breasts
  • Facebook’s automatic anti-nudity algorithm rejected the image as inappropriate
  • The festival appealed the decision and the advert was allowed to be reinstated 

A Facebook blunder banned a beer festival advert because of nudity laws – over a Renaissance-style artwork showing a woman’s breasts.

An advert for the Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival at a concert hall was rejected because the panel art on the walls failed Facebook’s automated nudity laws.

The panels, painted by Sir Frank Brangwyn in the 1920s, were originally due to cover walls at the House of Lords before being bought by Swansea Council.

Paintings by Sir Frank Brangwyn (pictured) have fallen foul of Facebook’s strict anti-nudity policy becuase the Renaissance-era artworks contained women’s breasts

The artwork featured in a Facebook advert for the Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival (pictured) but were removed by the social media giant

The artwork featured in a Facebook advert for the Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival (pictured) but were removed by the social media giant

They adorn the walls of what is now called Brangwyn Hall, named in the artist’s honour.

But they appeared in the background of a picture promoting the Swansea Bay Beer and Cider Festival – and the advert was banned by Facebook.

The mural’s depictions of women’s bare breasts and buttocks was deemed too risque for the social media giant, and it was rejected for being ‘inappropriate’.

Kay Byrne, who was managing the Facebook page for the festival, said: ‘I didn’t have a clue what the hell they were on about.’

She was told the image had fallen foul of the site’s automatic anti-nudity algorithm but after appealing the decision the advert was allowed to be reinstated. 

The artworks (pictured) adorn the walls of what is now called Brangwyn Hall, named in the artist's honour

The artworks (pictured) adorn the walls of what is now called Brangwyn Hall, named in the artist’s honour

Festival organisers were told the image had fallen foul of the site's automatic anti-nudity algorithm but after appealing the decision the advert was allowed to be reinstated

Festival organisers were told the image had fallen foul of the site’s automatic anti-nudity algorithm but after appealing the decision the advert was allowed to be reinstated

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk