News, Culture & Society

Footage shows referee made contact with Tunisia player during FIFA Qatar World Cup loss to Socceroos

New footage shows referee made contact with Tunisia defender in the lead-up to Socceroos striker Mitch Duke’s match-winning goal…and fans are up in arms over the confusion

  • A new camera angle shows Tunisian midfielder Ellyes Skhiri was tripped  
  • Skhiri made contact with World Cup debutant referee Daniel Siebert, and failed to chase Australia’s counter, leading to Mitchell Duke’s game-winner
  • Fans are arguing the contact allowed Australia time and space for a wide attack

New footage from Australia’s World Cup win over Tunisia shows referee Daniel Siebert making contact with midfielder Ellyes Skhiri on his desperate run to stop an impending Socceroos goal – as fans cry out in controversy.

Moments before Mitchell Duke’s iconic header that took the Socceroos to a third FIFA World Cup Finals win, debutant referee Siebert crossed paths with a rushing Ellyes Skhiri.

Tunisian midfielder Ellyes Skhiri brushes the foot of referee Daniel Siebert – impeding his chase on Australian Riley McGree

Skhiri’s left foot was interfered by Siebert’s trailing ankle, as he failed to tuck in his leg given the pace of Australia’s counter.

The new angle was not seen by live viewers on Saturday night and now gives Tunisian fans an excuse to argue their defeat. 

Fans against Australia say the contact on Skhiri gave Socceroos midfielder Riley McGree space to play out wide for Craig Goodwin, who in turn found a flying Mitchell Duke.

Mitchell Duke puts the ball on a string after an amazing header found the back left of the net against Tunisia

Mitchell Duke puts the ball on a string after an amazing header found the back left of the net against Tunisia

The Bundesliga club player went down in the centre circle straight after the collision, clutching at his leg in what was a penalty grab. 

Since the vision has been released, fans have shared their outrage on Twitter.

‘Surely play should stop and be restarted with a drop ball, same as if the ball hits the ref?,’ one spectator commented. 

FIFA regulations outline a referee must stop and start play when making contact with the ball, but nothing in the book mentions the official tackling a passing by player.

Tunisian and Bundesliga midfielder Ellyes Skhiri cries out for a free kick during their 1-0 loss to the Socceroos

Tunisian and Bundesliga midfielder Ellyes Skhiri cries out for a free kick during their 1-0 loss to the Socceroos

Many fans believed the German referee was worthy of a yellow card, while those in favour of the goal say Skhiri was no real chance of chasing down McGree.

Others thought Siebert was one-sided when giving cards for time wasting, and believe he was inexperienced for the world stage.

The trip was reposted by BBC Sport on Twitter with the caption ‘REF!’, sparking a debate between football tragics. 

Tunisia still managed to finish the game with five more shots on target than Australia. 

Skhiri (L) tones it down as referee Daniel Siebert checks on Aissa Laidouni after a free kick was awarded

Skhiri (L) tones it down as referee Daniel Siebert checks on Aissa Laidouni after a free kick was awarded

Skhiri declined to speak on the matter post-game, but believed Tunisia demonstrated they were the ‘better team’.

Whether the foul should’ve been pulled up or not, Australian fans are relishing the class of Mitchell Duke and the mouth-watering prospect of a final 16 birth.

Tunisia must now down the defending champions France to have any chance at making it through the pool stage. 



***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



Find local lawyers and law firms at USAttorneys.com