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Girl kisses mother Vicky Fenn days before she lost cancer battle

This is the moment an eight-year-old girl shares a tender kiss with her mother just days before she died from cancer – leaving her daughter an orphan.

Vicky Fenn, 38, from Benfleet, Essex, was diagnosed with terminal breast cancer a year after her partner, Bob, passed away in his sleep aged 55.

She was given two years to live and knew she would be leaving behind her daughter Roxy to grow up without both her parents.

The beloved mother died on Wednesday night surrounded by her family, with the heartbreaking news being shared on her Facebook page, ‘Fenn’s Fighters’.

This is the moment an eight-year-old girl shares a tender kiss with her mother just days before she died from cancer – leaving her daughter an orphan

Vicky Fenn, 38, from Benfleet, Essex, was diagnosed with terminal breast cancer a year after her partner, Bob, passed away in his sleep aged 55. She was given two years to live and knew she would be leaving behind her daughter Roxy to grow up without both her parents

Vicky Fenn, 38, from Benfleet, Essex, was diagnosed with terminal breast cancer a year after her partner, Bob, passed away in his sleep aged 55. She was given two years to live and knew she would be leaving behind her daughter Roxy to grow up without both her parents

A post on Thursday morning read: ‘It’s with a heavy heart that I have to let you all know that Vicky went to sleep at 11.30 last night.

‘She was peaceful, pain free and surrounded by Family. Her fight is over. Thank you all for your kind messages of love and support over the last few days and we will share funeral arrangements next week. Lots of love to all Fenn’s Fighters.’

The family have been struck by a series of tragedies as young Roxy lost her father following several problems with his heart and triple bypass surgery.

Vicky was devastated when she received the news that she would soon be following her partner after finding a lump in her breast in July 2016 – almost one year to the day since Bob had passed away.

Then aged 36, she was diagnosed with stage three grade three invasive lobular triple negative breast cancer.

But that didn’t stop the heartbroken mother from making the most of the time she had left.

Fenn's Fighters posted on Thursday morning: ¿It¿s with a heavy heart that I have to let you all know that Vicky went to sleep at 11.30 last night'

Fenn’s Fighters posted on Thursday morning: ‘It’s with a heavy heart that I have to let you all know that Vicky went to sleep at 11.30 last night’

‘After my terminal diagnosis, I immediately booked Roxy and I on a plane to Florida for a bucket list holiday, she told the Mirror in February.

She also prepared a box full of cards and presents for each milestone of her daughter’s that she would miss.

The mother said she was buying birthdays, engagement and wedding cards, as well as writing letters for her little girl.

She also planned to crochet two blankets for Roxy – one for a girl and one for a boy – to be given to Vicky’s first grandchild.

Speaking about her diagnosis, the mother said: ’Roxy’s already lost a parent. I’ve not even lost a parent. And now she’s facing the prospect of losing both her mummy and daddy. I’m not the unlucky one, she is.

The beloved mother died on Wednesday

The beloved mother died on Wednesday

‘My dad too, he’s heartbroken. It’s not the way round it’s supposed to happen for him. He wanted me to outlive him, not the other way around.’

After noticing the lump Vicky went to the doctors and was sent for a mammogram, then an ultrasound scan and a biopsy – but even with all the tests the mother didn’t think she had cancer.

Having attended the appointments on her own, Vicky soon rang her family after receiving the upsetting news.

‘I called my dad…his voice changed almost immediately. He already sounded like someone who was grieving. I might as well have told him I had died that night.’

Medical experts told Vicky that they type of cancer she was suffering from was extremely rare in a woman of her age as it is usually found in older women.

She was initially informed that the cancer wasn’t advanced and could be curable – weeks later the disease had spread to her bones. It was terminal.

Vicky never lied to her daughter about her condition and told her the truth – but that didn’t define their remaining time together.

The inspiring mother wanted to leave a legacy behind and ensure that other children are never left in the same position as her own daughter.

She started a petition calling for the age for mandatory mammograms to be reduced – currently only women between the ages of 50 and 70 are offered three-yearly screenings on the NHS.

Vicky never lied to her daughter about her condition and told her the truth - but that didn¿t define their remaining time together

Vicky never lied to her daughter about her condition and told her the truth - but that didn¿t define their remaining time together

Vicky never lied to her daughter about her condition and told her the truth – but that didn’t define their remaining time together

The inspiring mother wanted to leave a legacy behind and ensure that other children are never left in the same position as her own daughter 

The inspiring mother wanted to leave a legacy behind and ensure that other children are never left in the same position as her own daughter 

There are nearly 12,000 signatures so far, but 100,000 are needed before it can be considered for debate in Parliament.

Five months remain before the deadline on the petition comes to an end, on September 21 this year.

In a statement, the Department of Health said: ‘The NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHS BSP) in England offers all women between the ages of 50 and 70 the opportunity to be screened every three years for breast cancer, in order to help detect abnormalities and reduce the number of lives lost to invasive breast cancer.

‘The aim of the NHS BSP is to detect breast cancer early when there is a greater chance of cure, thus reducing the number of lives lost to invasive breast cancer.

‘The programme recognises that whilst early detection is the best way to reduce breast cancer mortality by giving the opportunity to offer women more treatment options, which may save lives, it accepts that there are also risks.

‘These risks include over-diagnosis (referring women for unnecessary tests) and over-treatment (operating on women with disease which is unlikely to cause serious harm to them).

‘For women under the age of 50, breast screening is not very effective, especially when they have not reached the menopause .

‘Breast screening is offered from the age of 50 based on the average age of menopause being 51 and that the chance of developing breast cancer increases with age.

‘Four out of five breast cancers develop in women over the age of 50. There is insufficient evidence to confidently offer breast screening to women at a much younger age because to do so may cause more harm than good.’

 



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