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Good Society consent video shows woman smear milkshake on boyfriend and is slammed by critics

Bizarre videos that include a woman smearing a man’s face with a milkshake to teach schoolchildren about sexual consent have been slammed by experts.

The videos have been funded by the Department of Education, Skills and Employment and were made available on The Good Society website in March.

They attempt to teach students about several issues ranging from sexual consent to respect, binge drinking and peer pressure.

Among the list of strange videos is a man eating a taco, while the narrator explains sexual assault, and a woman, who is afraid of swimming, being pressured to go into the water by her spear-gun-toting boyfriend.  

End Rape on Campus Australia founder Sharna Bremner told Daily Mail Australia the videos were ‘confusing’ and ‘inappropriate’. 

‘The general feedback has been, “What the hell is this?” There’s a way to use different scenarios to address serious issues, but this seems to be taking the piss to be honest.’

A video, titled ‘Moving the Line’, tries to explain the different levels of consent by showing a couple enjoying a drink at a milkshake bar

The woman is seen scooping out a handful of milkshake from her steel cup before pushing it into the face of her partner

The woman is seen scooping out a handful of milkshake from her steel cup before pushing it into the face of her partner

One video, titled ‘Moving the Line’, tries to explain the different levels of consent by showing a couple enjoying a drink at a milkshake bar.  

A man narrates over the footage and opens with the line: ‘To cross into the action zone, both people must agree.’ 

The woman turns to her boyfriend and asks, ‘Do you want to try my milkshake?’

Her partner happily accepts the offer and takes a big sip before the woman asks, ‘Is it better than yours?’

The question is in reference to the hit 2003 song ‘Milkshake’ by pop singer Kelis.  

The boyfriend says he prefers his own milkshake and his partner scoffs, disappointed at the response. 

‘But what happens when one person takes action without an agreement?’ the voiceover says.

The woman is seen scooping out a handful of milkshake from her steel cup before pushing it into the face of her partner.

‘Drink it,’ she says. ‘Drink it, drink it all.’ 

‘What are you doing?’ the man says, shocked.

She takes a selfie on her phone before grabbing a handful of ground-up nuts and smothering them over her boyfriend's face, while laughing

She takes a selfie on her phone before grabbing a handful of ground-up nuts and smothering them over her boyfriend’s face, while laughing

The man's partner goes on to cover his face in ground-up nuts as she humiliates him at the milkshake bar

The man’s partner goes on to cover his face in ground-up nuts as she humiliates him at the milkshake bar

The man later tries to get up and leave the table when his girlfriend holds him by his arm and says, ‘You don’t go anywhere.’

She takes a selfie on her phone before grabbing a handful of ground-up nuts and smothering them over her boyfriend’s face, while laughing.   

‘Get off me Veronica,’ the visibly upset boyfriend says. ‘I hate you so much right now’. 

Ms Bremner says the ridiculousness of the video took away from the very serious issue of sexual assault and coercive control.

‘I do imagine the year 10, 11 and 12 kids would have a good giggle at the video,’ she said.

‘These students are not in need of coddling. We need to speak to them seriously about these serious issues.’  

A video titled 'Yes, no, I don't know' depicts a woman at the beach who is egged on by her friend, with a spear gun, to go into the water

A video titled ‘Yes, no, I don’t know’ depicts a woman at the beach who is egged on by her friend, with a spear gun, to go into the water

A man holds the heavily-innuendoed taco in his hand as the narrator talks about consent in the video 'Stop, Ask, Listen'

A man holds the heavily-innuendoed taco in his hand as the narrator talks about consent in the video ‘Stop, Ask, Listen’

Sexual, domestic and family violence expert Karen Willis added students were ‘more sophisticated than this content gives them credit for’. 

‘And sex and consent is far more complicated than videos about milkshakes and sharks at the beach,’ she said. 

Ms Bremner said the resources were out of touch and failed to take into consideration any survivors of rape or sexual assault in the classroom.

‘We know that in classrooms of senior students, there will be many who have already experienced rape,’ she said.

‘This resource fails to properly consider there may be a survivor in the classroom, and even includes inaccurate and inadequate information on avenues for support and reporting.’ 

Daily Mail Australia contacted the Department of Education, Skills and Employment for comment. 

The videos were uploaded following an online petition demanding improved sex education in private schools.

The videos have been funded by the Department of Education, Skills and Employment and were made available on The Good Society website in March

The videos have been funded by the Department of Education, Skills and Employment and were made available on The Good Society website in March

Former Sydney school student Chanel Contos, 22, launched the campaign titled teachusconsent.com

Former Sydney school student Chanel Contos, 22, launched the campaign titled teachusconsent.com 

Former Sydney school student Chanel Contos, 22, launched the campaign titled teachusconsent.com. 

Ms Contos was motivated to create the campaign after collecting testimonies from more than 4,000 students who claimed they were abused at the hands of boyfriends or older boys. 

Among the testimonies were claims that several schools cultivated a culture of entitlement and privilege.

‘The majority of signatories to this petition will have long since graduated from school,’ Ms Contos wrote on the petition.

‘Most are now at university or in their early years of the workforce with their high school days only a distant memory. 

‘Yet, they are advocating for younger generations to receive an education that they were either deprived of or received far too late.

‘This highlights the long lasting impacts that sexual assault at a young age leaves not just on the victim, but their friends and the wider community.’

Ms Contos said many school-aged boys often didn't even realise what they'd done constituted sexual assault

Ms Contos said many school-aged boys often didn’t even realise what they’d done constituted sexual assault

Ms Contos was motivated to create the campaign after collecting testimonies from more than 4,000 students who claimed they were abused at the hands of boyfriends or older boy

Ms Contos was motivated to create the campaign after collecting testimonies from more than 4,000 students who claimed they were abused at the hands of boyfriends or older boy

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk