News, Culture & Society

Gordon Reid is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major

Gordon Reid is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major…while Nick Kyrgios walks away from the Olympic Games

  • The BBC announced a new three-year deal to broadcast Wimbledon until 2027
  • Gordon Reid is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major
  • The withdrawal of Nick Kyrgios from the Olympic Games is unlikely to be the last 

Gordon Reid is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major after beating Argentina’s Gustavo Fernandez the wheelchair semi-finals.

While the BBC have announced that they will continue to broadcast Wimbledon until at least 2027 after a new three-year deal finalised. 

Here’s Sportsmail’s court recap of this summer’s Championships so far…   

Here’s Sportsmail’s court recap of this summer’s Championships so far…

Beeb seal deal to show championships till 2027

The BBC will be the home of Wimbledon until at least 2027 after the broadcaster on Friday confirmed a three-year extension to their contract with the All England Club.

The agreement guarantees that Wimbledon will remain free-to-air for UK fans and is an extension to the longest partnership in sports broadcasting history, which began in 1937 when Don Budge lifted the men’s singles trophy and Britain’s Dorothy Round won the women’s. 

The BBC’s radio coverage goes back further, with live commentary from Centre Court starting in 1927 — meaning 2027 will be a centenary celebration.

The BBC have announced a new three-year deal to broadcast Wimbledon until at least 2027

The BBC have announced a new three-year deal to broadcast Wimbledon until at least 2027

Reid all about it!

Gordon Reid is a match away from his second Wimbledon singles title and third major after beating Argentina’s Gustavo Fernandez 6-4, 0-6, 6-2 in the wheelchair semi-finals. 

He will face Belgium’s Joachim Gerard in Sunday’s final. Reid is also going for his seventh straight Grand Slam doubles title after making the final alongside Alfie Hewitt. 

Gordon Reid (above) is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major

Gordon Reid (above) is a match away from his second Wimbledon title and third major

Golden slam chances grow greater by the day

The withdrawal of Nick Kyrgios from the Olympics is unlikely to be the last. Rafa Nadal ruled himself out last month and Roger Federer could still follow suit, which would mean the draw is opening up further for Novak Djokovic. 

With an eye on his legacy as always, Djokovic said last week that the Games are next to the Slams as his main goal this season. 

A win in Tokyo would complete the Golden Slam — all four majors plus an Olympics title — and with a field increasingly resembling more of an ATP 500 event than one of the most prestigious tournaments, a gold medal to complete the set may not elude him for long.

The withdrawal of Nick Kyrgios (above) from the Olympic Games is unlikely to be the last

The withdrawal of Nick Kyrgios (above) from the Olympic Games is unlikely to be the last

Henman’s serve and volley game a dying art

Remember when Wimbledon was the home of serve and volley? You must have a good memory. 

Figures published by broadcaster Nick Lester this week revealed its gradual decline in the first two decades of the 21st century. 

From being the stock-in-trade of seven-time champion Pete Sampras, home favourite Tim Henman and two-time finalist Pat Rafter, slower courts and more powerful rackets have seen it become a dying art.

Still, the figures are marked. In 2001, a whopping 37 per cent of points in the men’s draw were serve and volley.

The next 10 years saw a decline each summer and by 2010 that was down to eight per cent. Going into Friday’s semi-finals, this year’s figure was down to just four per cent.

There is a decline of serve and volley in Wimbledon in the first two decades of the 21st century

There is a decline of serve and volley in Wimbledon in the first two decades of the 21st century

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk