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Grand Canyon is so hot that hikers are warned their boots will MELT as temperatures soar to 114F

Grand Canyon hikers were warned their boots could literally melt apart and their feet will suffer blisters because of extreme heat conditions at the national park this week.

The National Park Service expects temperatures will hit 114 degrees Fahrenheit by 8pm Wednesday and could get 30 degrees hotter in the canyon’s lower elevations. 

‘Thinking of hiking in the Grand Canyon this week? Not a good idea,’ the park service tweeted, warning hikers away from the lower areas and alerting that ‘An Excessive Heat Warning’ was issued below 4000 feet through Wednesday.

Grand Canyon hikers were warned their boots could literally melt apart and their feet will develop blisters because of extreme heat conditions at the national park this week. Pictured is an image posted online by the park service showing the affects of the heat on foot ware

The National Park Service expects temperatures will hit 114 degrees Fahrenheit and could get 30 degrees hotter in the canyon's lower elevations by 8pm Wednesday

The National Park Service expects temperatures will hit 114 degrees Fahrenheit and could get 30 degrees hotter in the canyon’s lower elevations by 8pm Wednesday

The National Park Service warned against hiking at the Grand Canyon in a tweet that warned about the punishing heat expected in lower elevations

The National Park Service warned against hiking at the Grand Canyon in a tweet that warned about the punishing heat expected in lower elevations

‘Grand Canyon is an unforgiving environment,’ says the park service in another social media post. 

‘The heat inside the canyon can cause shoes to come apart, and heavy hiking boots can trap sweat and lead to painful blisters,’ park service officials explained. 

‘Before setting off on a hike, understand the limitations of yourself and your gear.’

The extreme heat in the lower elevations was being caused by a compression of air as it descends into the canyon, according the National Weather Service.   

During what is known as ‘adiabatic heating’, air becomes more compressed as it descends into the canyon, and releases energy the further down it goes.

For example, temperatures of around 89F at an elevation of 8,200 feet can shoot up to 112F at an elevation of 2,500 feet as the air becomes more and more compressed at lower levels of the canyon. 

That’s in fact what the park service expects at the canyon’s Phantom Ranch this afternoon.

The extreme heat in the lower elevations was being caused by a compression of air as it descends into the canyon, according the National Weather Service. The chart above shows how 'adiabatic heating' can raise temperatures in lower elevations of the canyon

The extreme heat in the lower elevations was being caused by a compression of air as it descends into the canyon, according the National Weather Service. The chart above shows how ‘adiabatic heating’ can raise temperatures in lower elevations of the canyon

‘Stay hydrated and limit outdoor activities during the late morning and afternoon hours,’ the park service told would-be hikers.

How adiabatic heating happens

Air as it descends into the canyon becomes more compressed, according the National Weather Service.

As it becomes more compressed, the air releases energy the further down it goes.

For example, temperatures of around 89 degrees Fahrenheit at an elevation of 8,200 feet can shoot up to 112F at an elevation of 2,500 feet as the air becomes more and more compressed at lower levels of the canyon. 

The canyon warnings come as much of the West has experienced a brutal heat wave this week at the same time wildfires are burning in the region. 

Temperatures across western states have reached the triple digits as wildfires have raged across Arizona, marking an ominous start to the fire season in the region, which many fear will be severe due to hot, dry conditions.

So far this year, wildfires have burned more than 170,000 acres in Arizona, nearly four times the area destroyed by fire at the same point in 2019, according to officials.  

As the extreme heat condition warnings have been issued at the Grand Canyon, park service workers have already had to respond to several heat-related search and rescue incidents. 

A river runner began ‘experiencing heat illness and fatigue,’ on a Colorado River Trip Saturday, the park service says.

The runner was in an ‘altered state of consciousness,’ after drinking an excessive quantity of water, leading to hyponatremia, a term used to describe a dangerous drop in the body’s sodium levels. 

The runner had to be transported by helicopter and ambulance to the Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona, the park service says.

As the extreme heat condition warnings have been issued, park service workers have already had to respond to several heat-related search and rescue incidents. Two people (including one person pictured) had to be flown by helicopter to a local hospital for treatment.

As the extreme heat condition warnings have been issued, park service workers have already had to respond to several heat-related search and rescue incidents. Two people (including one person pictured) had to be flown by helicopter to a local hospital for treatment.

On Sunday, Indian Garden rangers responded to a ranger in a similar ‘altered level of consciousness’ on the Bright Angel Trail.

When the rangers arrived, the hiker was in heat stroke and required immediate cooling measures, the park service said.

The hiker also was taken to Flagstaff Medical Center for treatment.

The park service also responded to hikers in need of assistance for heat exhaustion on the Bright Angel and South Kaibab trails. 

The National Park Service tweeted that the Grand Canyon is 'an unforgiving environment'

The National Park Service tweeted that the Grand Canyon is ‘an unforgiving environment’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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