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Grim footage captures a tick being removed from inside a woman’s ear

Stomach-churning footage shows a TICK lodged deep inside a 50-year-old’s ear which a doctor spotted after she complained of tinnitus

  • The Thai woman sought help from doctors for the ringing noise in her ear 
  • A specialist peered inside the 50-year-old woman’s ear and saw the arachnid 
  • The unidentified woman went to the Buddhachinaraj Hospital in Phitsanulok 

Gruesome footage shows a live tick lodged deep inside the ear of a woman who thought she just had tinnitus. 

The 50-year-old, from Thailand, sought help from doctors after feeling a strange sensation and ringing noise in her left ear. 

A specialist peered inside the unidentified woman’s ear and saw the tiny arachnid burrowed in her ear canal.  

The 50-year-old, from Thailand, sought help from doctors after feeling a strange sensation and ringing noise in her left ear (pictured, the tick inside her ear)

A specialist peered inside the unidentified woman's ear and saw the tiny arachnid burrowed in her ear canal (pictured, the tick after it was removed)

A specialist peered inside the unidentified woman’s ear and saw the tiny arachnid burrowed in her ear canal (pictured, the tick after it was removed)

The same grim footage also shows what is thought to be the same tick wriggling around on the end of a medical instrument, after it was removed. 

The woman went to the Buddhachinaraj Hospital in Phitsanulok on Wednesday morning, where medics examined her.

Ticks live in woods and areas with long grass, the NHS says. They can be found all over the UK. The blood-sucking arachnids don't jump or fly, instead they attach to animals or humans that may brush past them (pictured, the tick)

Ticks live in woods and areas with long grass, the NHS says. They can be found all over the UK. The blood-sucking arachnids don’t jump or fly, instead they attach to animals or humans that may brush past them (pictured, the tick)

Pictured is Piradee Chanmonthon, the 37-year-old specialist who successfully removed the 6mm-long tick using a micro-suction tube

Pictured is Piradee Chanmonthon, the 37-year-old specialist who successfully removed the 6mm-long tick using a micro-suction tube

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GET INSECTS OUT OF YOUR EAR? 

The Mayo Clinic, a non-profit medical organization in the US, states oil is the best option for getting rid of insects from the ear.

In guidance issued on its website, it says the person should tilt their head so that insect’s route out is upwards.

Pouring warm oil, such as olive or baby oil, into the ear to float it out should work, the guidance states.

However, Mayo Clinic said: ‘Don’t use oil to remove an object other than an insect.’

Otolaryngologist Piradee Chanmonthon, 37, successfully removed the 6mm-long tick using a micro-suction tube. 

When asked about her background, the patient said she has many dogs who she allows to run in the fields and swim in canals.

Ticks live in woods and areas with long grass, the NHS says. They can be found all over the UK.

The blood-sucking arachnids don’t jump or fly, instead they attach to animals or humans that may brush past them. 

The doctor said: ”Luckily, the tick didn’t lay eggs or hadn’t embedded in her ear because that would take longer to removed and might have involved an operation.’

This clip comes after similarly stomach-churning footage earlier this month showed doctors plucking a tiny spider out of a woman’s ear.  

The unidentified patient, from Vietnam, had complained of ear pain, according to local reports.

She sought medical help at a clinic in the city of Hai Duong – around 50miles (80km) east of the country’s capital of Hanoi. 

WHAT IS TINNITUS? 

Tinnitus is the name for hearing noises, such as ringing, buzzing or hissing, that are not caused by an outside source, according to the NHS.

It occurs due to damage to the cochlear hair cells in the inner ear, which stretch and contract in accordance with sound-induced vibrations.

Very loud noises – at a nightclub or played over headphones – can overload these cells, leaving them temporarily or permanently damages.

The damage forces other parts of the ear to overwork to compensate for the loss of function, which leads to tinnitus and eventually chronic hearing loss.

Some 15 per cent of adults in the UK suffer from tinnitus, according to figures.

There is no cure. Treatment focuses on counselling and therapies to help people find ways of coping with their condition and reducing any anxiety it causes. 

Tinnitus retraining therapy uses sound therapy to retrain the brain to tune out and be less aware of ringing and buzzing noises.

Deep breathing, yoga and joining support groups can also help. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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