News, Culture & Society

Harley Davidson unveils its first ever electric bike – the $3,399 Serial 1 which can go up to 28mph

Born to be wired! Harley Davidson unveils its first ever electric bike – the $3,399 Serial 1 which can go up to 258mph and travel more than 100 miles before it needs charging

  • Serial 1 takes its name from the first Harley in 1903, ‘Serial Number One’ 
  • There are two versions, with pricing ranging from $3,399 to $4,999 
  • The top-line model, Rush, can reach 28 mph and go 115 miles before recharging
  • The bikes will hit the US and Germany in spring 2021 for pre-orders

Harley-Davidson has unveiled its first line of pedal-assist electric bicycles, targeting recreational riders and urban commuters.

Priced from $3,399 to $4,999, the Serial 1 bicycles come in two models: The Mosh and the Rush. 

The bikes can reach speeds of up to 28 mph, depending on the model, and come in four different frame sizes. 

A full charge on the Serial 1 takes 6.5 hours, or 3.5 hours for a 75 percent charge.

Pre-orders are being taken now, with the first bikes expected in the US and Germany in spring 2021.

Harley-Davidson has unveiled the first e-bikes from Serial 1, the Mosh and the Rush, which comes in three variations. The Rush/Cty Step-Thru (seen here) eliminates the crossbar

Serial 1 has been spun off as a separate enterprise, with Harley-Davidson as a minority owner.

The name comes from the nickname of the first Harley sold back in 1903, ‘Serial Number One.’

Prototypes were first teased in November 2019 at the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan.

Last month another prototype was unveiled, with elements harkening back to its 1903 forefather, including a leather saddle and white tires.

The entry-level Mosh/Cty retails for $3,399 and can reach speeds of up to 20 mph

The entry-level Mosh/Cty retails for $3,399 and can reach speeds of up to 20 mph

Priced at $4,999, the top-of-the-line Rush/City Speed can reach 28mph and comes with an LED screen that displays speed, battery level and other data

Priced at $4,999, the top-of-the-line Rush/City Speed can reach 28mph and comes with an LED screen that displays speed, battery level and other data

Those vintage elements are gone now, replaced with a more streamlined, minimal design.

The cycles are made of an hydroformed aluminum frame, with Brose mid-mounted motors and Gates carbon drive belts.

The Mosh/Cty can reach 20mph and can go 105 miles before it needs a recharge. 

The Rush/Cty tops out at 115 miles and has two variants — the Step-Thru, which eliminates the crossbar, and the top-end City Speed.

It also comes with an LED screen that displays speed, battery level and other data.

The Mosh Cty (pictured) can go 105 miles before it needs a recharge. All the Serial 1 e-bikes hare made of an hydroformed aluminum frame, with Brose mid-mounted motors and Gates carbon drive belts

The Mosh Cty (pictured) can go 105 miles before it needs a recharge. All the Serial 1 e-bikes hare made of an hydroformed aluminum frame, with Brose mid-mounted motors and Gates carbon drive belts

E-bike sales increased 190 percent in June 2020 compared to the same period last year, according to market research company the NDP Group, as commuters avoided public transit during the pandemic.

But the vehicles were gaining steam even before then, with global sales in 2019 estimated to be over $15 billion. 

A prototype of the Serial 1 (foreground) was inspired by Harley-Davidson's first motorcycle from 1903 (back). The commercial models lack vintage elements like white tires and leather saddle and grips

A prototype of the Serial 1 (foreground) was inspired by Harley-Davidson’s first motorcycle from 1903 (back). The commercial models lack vintage elements like white tires and leather saddle and grips

A fear of public transportation and decreased car congestion has only seen interest surge.

‘A car-free space that would have taken 10 years and 100 community meetings to implement has instead been rolled out in weeks because of the COVID emergency,’ cyclist advocate Matt Brezina told Axios in August 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.