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Harry Styles mocks controversy surrounding Vogue Gucci dress cover

Harry Styles has mocked the controversy surrounding his U.S. Vogue cover where he wore a Gucci dress, by posting a snap of himself in a frilly ensemble, alongside the words ‘bring back manly men!’

The photograph shared by Harry was taken from a new shoot with Variety and showed him wearing a powder blue suit and ruffled white blouse, while eating a banana, after he was awarded hitmaker of the year by the magazine.

The singer, 26, posed for the feminine high-fashion shoot with the publication, and opened up about his choice to wear ‘female’ clothing and the ‘blurred lines’ of gender.

Having his say: Harry Styles has mocked the furore surrounding his U.S. Vogue cover by posting a snap of himself in a frilly ensemble, alongside the words ‘bring back manly men!’

Caption: Although Harry didn't publicly comment at the time, he has now had his say through social media by reposting the high-fashion look from the interview

Caption: Although Harry didn’t publicly comment at the time, he has now had his say through social media by reposting the high-fashion look from the interview

He said: ‘To not wear [something] because it’s females’ clothing, you shut off a whole world of great clothes.

‘And I think what’s exciting about right now is you can wear what you like. It doesn’t have to be X or Y. Those lines are becoming more and more blurred.’ 

Harry recently made history as the first ever solo male cover star of the American version of Vogue – and for the occasion he opted to shake things up with his sartorial choices, donning a ball gown and a custom jacket. 

The caption on his new snap was in reference to comments made by right-wing pundit Candace Owens, who insisted society can’t survive without ‘strong men’, after Harry posed on the cover wearing a Gucci dress.   

Comment: The 26-year-old singer's caption was in reference to comments made by right-wing pundit Candace Owens, who insisted society can't survive without 'strong men', after Harry posed on the cover of Vogue wearing a Gucci dress'

Comment: The 26-year-old singer’s caption was in reference to comments made by right-wing pundit Candace Owens, who insisted society can’t survive without ‘strong men’, after Harry posed on the cover of Vogue wearing a Gucci dress’

Following the release of the magazine, Owens tweeted: ‘There is no society that can survive without strong men.

Adding: ‘The East knows this. In the west, the steady feminisation of our men at the same time that Marxism is being taught to our children is not a coincidence. It is an outright attack. Bring back manly men. 

Although Harry didn’t publicly comment at the time, he has now had his say through social media by reposting the high-fashion look from the interview.

History making: Harry made history as the first ever solo male cover star of the American version of Vogue - and for the occasion he opted to shake things up with his sartorial choices, donning a ball gown and a custom jacket (pictured)

History making: Harry made history as the first ever solo male cover star of the American version of Vogue – and for the occasion he opted to shake things up with his sartorial choices, donning a ball gown and a custom jacket (pictured)

Feminine: During an interview with the publication, Harry spoke about his decision to opt for feminine clothing choices, as well as wearing garments more typically associated with men

Feminine: During an interview with the publication, Harry spoke about his decision to opt for feminine clothing choices, as well as wearing garments more typically associated with men

After making her initial comments, Owens doubled down on her criticism of Harry, renewing her calls to ‘bring back manly men’ days after she slammed the former One Direction star.

In what she described as ‘the steady feminization of our men’, in a thread of tweets she addressed the controversy her comments have since provoked and sought also to reiterate her stance on the matter.

‘Since I’m trending I’d like to clarify what I meant when I said ‘bring back manly men’,’ she wrote in response to the backlash Monday. ‘I meant: Bring back manly men.

‘Terms like ‘toxic masculinity’, were created by toxic females. Real women don’t do fake feminism,’ she continued. ‘Sorry I’m not sorry.

While Harry kept quiet at the time, other celebrities jumped to his defence.

Low blow: Olivia Wilde hit back by branding Candace 'pathetic', prompting the media personality to return a low blow as she stated, 'You're single for a reason'

Low blow: Olivia Wilde hit back by branding Candace ‘pathetic’, prompting the media personality to return a low blow as she stated, ‘You’re single for a reason’

Lord of the Rings star Elijah Wood also offered his two cents on Monday, writing: ‘I think you’ve missed the definition of what a man is. Masculinity alone does not make a man.’ ‘DON’T TEMPT ME, FRODO,’ she wrote in response

Lord of the Rings star Elijah Wood also offered his two cents on Monday, writing: ‘I think you’ve missed the definition of what a man is. Masculinity alone does not make a man.’ ‘DON’T TEMPT ME, FRODO,’ she wrote in response

Among them was Olivia Wilde, the director behind the upcoming movie, Don’t Worry Darling, in which Harry stars in a leading role.

In her response, Wilde simply wrote: ‘You’re pathetic.’

Owens then directly referenced Wilde’s recent split with actor Jason Sudeikis when she shockingly hit back: ‘You’re single for a reason.’ The tweet was subsequently deleted.

Lord of the Rings star Elijah Wood also offered his two cents on Monday, writing: ‘I think you’ve missed the definition of what a man is. Masculinity alone does not make a man.’

Harry said: 'To not wear [something] because it's females' clothing, you shut off a whole world of great clothes'

Harry said: ‘To not wear [something] because it’s females’ clothing, you shut off a whole world of great clothes’

‘DON’T TEMPT ME, FRODO,’ she wrote in response, before later adding: ‘Sorry. One of my favorite movies. Couldn’t miss the opportunity. I’m only human.’

Elsewhere during his new chat with the entertainment outlet, Harry discussed his time in One Direction, self-reflection during the pandemic and political divisiveness.

Harry was in the band from its inception on the X Factor in 2010 until they announced a hiatus in 2015 so they could pursue solo projects. 

Speaking on his time in the globally successful boyband, he said: ‘I learned so much. When we were in the band, I used to try and write with as many different people as I could. I wanted to practice — and I wrote a lot of bad s**t.’

Harry said: 'And I think what's exciting about right now is you can wear what you like. It doesn't have to be X or Y. Those lines are becoming more and more blurred'

Harry said: ‘And I think what’s exciting about right now is you can wear what you like. It doesn’t have to be X or Y. Those lines are becoming more and more blurred’

Harry went on to say how proud he is of his story in One Direction, and said: ‘When you look at the history of people coming out of bands and starting solo careers, they feel this need to apologize for being in the band. 

‘Don’t worry, everyone, that wasn’t me! Now I get to do what I really want to do.’ But we loved being in the band. I think there’s a want to pit people against each other. 

‘And I think it’s never been about that for us. It’s about a next step in evolution. The fact that we’ve all achieved different things outside of the band says a lot about how hard we worked in it.’

Harry also discussed taking a ‘pause’ during the pandemic, which he has seen as valuable time to stop think about his future as an artist.

Thoughtful: Harry also discussed taking a 'pause' during the pandemic, which he has seen as valuable time to stop think about his future as an artist

Thoughtful: Harry also discussed taking a ‘pause’ during the pandemic, which he has seen as valuable time to stop think about his future as an artist

He said: ‘It’s been a pause that I don’t know if I would have otherwise taken. I think it’s been pretty good for me to have a kind of stop, to look and think about what it actually means to be an artist, what it means to do what we do and why we do it. I lean into moments like this — moments of uncertainty.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk