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‘Healing church’ that sold BLEACH as a cure for coronavirus is fined $150,000

‘Healing church’ that sold BLEACH as a cure for cancer, HIV and coronavirus is fined $150,000 – but the dangerous solution is still on sale

  • The Genesis II Church of Health and Healing Australia have been fined $151,200
  • The church sells Miracle Mineral Supplement as a cure and treatment for disease
  • Four people were hospitalised in Victoria in 2014 after drinking the solution
  • The Therapeutic Goods Administration have classified the solution as poison
  • The church say the solution is a religious sacrament they should be free to use 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A healing church has been fined more than $150,000 for selling bleach marketed as a cure for coronavirus.

The Australian branch of the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing has been fined $151,200 for the alleged unlawful advertising of a Miracle Mineral Supplement by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA).

The church claims their Miracle Mineral Supplement solution, which contains textile bleaching agent sodium chlorite and is sold under MMS Australia, could cure and treat diseases including coronavirus, cancer and HIV.

TGA issued twelve infringement notices to the church and released a concerned statement about the harmful effects that can be caused by the ingestion of MMS.

A healing church has been fined more than $150,000 for selling bleach marketed as a cure for coronavirus (stock image)

‘There is no clinical, scientifically-accepted evidence showing that MMS can cure or alleviate any disease,’ the statement reads. 

‘The use of MMS presents serious health risks, and can result in nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and severe dehydration, which in some cases can result in hospitalisation.’

TGA officials are concerned over implications the solution is endorsed by health professionals with false claims and is still available for purchase on the MMS Australia website.

Four people were hospitalised in Victoria in 2014 after drinking the solution, which under the TGA’s guidelines is considered poison. 

‘The TGA is monitoring non-compliance, particularly in relation to the advertising of products that claim to prevent or cure COVID-19 and will continue to take action in relation to any advertisements that do not meet the requirements,’ the statement continues.

An MMS Australia spokesperson told The Guardian the solution is a religious sacrament they should be free to use and share as they please.

The dangerous Miracle Mineral Supplement (products labelled MMS pictured) currently for sale on the MMS Australia website and being advertised as a sacrament

The dangerous Miracle Mineral Supplement (products labelled MMS pictured) currently for sale on the MMS Australia website and being advertised as a sacrament

‘Our products, their descriptions and other information posted here are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease, and any apparent reference to same is inadvertent and purely coincidental,’ they said.

‘We do not believe in miracle cures, but in healthy, wholesome living and good nutrition to keep the temple of our souls, our bodies, clean and free of harmful chemicals and poisons. We also believe in the power of quiet contemplation, meditation and prayer.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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