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HEALTH NOTES: Clever plasters cut the amputation risk for diabetics 

HEALTH NOTES: Clever plasters cut the amputation risk for diabetics

A high-tech plaster that helps wounds heal twice as effectively as traditional dressings is now available on the NHS.

The patches are designed to treat diabetic leg and foot ulcers – long-term wounds that often fail to close for months or even years and affect 115,000 Britons.

Scientists behind the pioneering plasters, called UrgoStart (urgo.co.uk), predict they could save 3,000 diabetic patients from limb amputations every year.

The patches are designed to treat diabetic leg and foot ulcers (stock image)

Microbes in the foam padding and sterile fibres in the adhesive patch interact with bacteria on the skin, killing germs and kick-starting the body’s natural healing process.

The dressing remains sterile for a week and can be changed easily. Diabetes patients currently face regular appointments to re-dress infected wounds that take an average of five months to heall.

A new internet-based service could help insomniacs finally get a good night’s sleep.

SleepHubs is said to treat insomnia, restless leg syndrome and sleep apnoea. Users fill in a quick questionnaire on the website to highlight any health issues, then complete an in-depth survey. 

SleepHubs is said to treat insomnia, restless leg syndrome and sleep apnoea (stock image)

SleepHubs is said to treat insomnia, restless leg syndrome and sleep apnoea (stock image)

Treatments are suggested if a condition is detected. SleepHubs consultant physician Dr John O’Reilly says: ‘About a third of us have insomnia. This service offers a quick assessment, quick diagnosis and a quickly delivered treatment plan.’

The questionnaire is free, but prices for treatment range up to £249. sleephubs.com

A gym selfie? No sweat

More than eight in ten gym-goers regularly take selfies during their workout, new research has found.

At least six in ten people reckon they look their best while exercising, according to a survey of almost 2,000 British gym members – with a fifth admitting they actively avoid breaking into a sweat for fear of looking unattractive.

The study quizzed exercise enthusiasts aged between 18 to 60. Participants blamed the influence of social media sites for their image-related concerns.

Perfect way to keep warm 

A drop in temperature keeps couples busy between the sheets, according to a new analysis of global birth rates. On days when temperatures are below 26C, conception rates soar significantly, say University of California researchers, who looked at data stretching back 80 years.

The analysis may explain why the most popular birth date in the UK is September 26 – on average about 2,000 babies arrive on that day every year. The date falls 39 weeks after Christmas, when UK temperatures average 7C or 8C.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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