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Helena Bonham-Carter dons a brown wig as she films upcoming Holocaust drama One Life in Hampstead 

FIRST LOOK: Helena Bonham Carter dons a bob wig and clutches her coffee as she films new Holocaust drama One Life in Hampstead

Helena Bonham Carter looked worlds away from her quirky self as she filmed scenes for her upcoming drama, One Life, on Tuesday. 

The actress, 56, was seen wearing a curly brunette wig while in costume as she enjoyed a coffee break on set in in Hampstead. 

The BAFTA winner will join two-time Oscar winner Anthony Hopkins and Johnny Flynn in the feature drama that is set during the Holocaust.

In character: Helena Bonham-Carter looked worlds away from her quirky self as she filmed scenes for her upcoming drama One Life in Hampstead on Tuesday

The production is inspired by the true story of Nicholas Winton – a London stockbroker who devised an elaborate plan to rescue hundreds of children in Czechoslovakia from invading Nazis.

The title is paraphrased from the Jewish Talmud: ‘Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire.’

Helena will play Winton’s mother Babi Winton, who was of German-Jewish ancestry but had settled in North West London with her husband. 

Break time: The actress, 56, was seen wearing a brown wig while in costume while enjoying a coffee break on set

Break time: The actress, 56, was seen wearing a brown wig while in costume while enjoying a coffee break on set

According to Deadline, her scenes will be with Johnny Flynn, who portrays Winton in his younger years. 

Dressed in casual 1940’s attire, Helena donned a shin-length green knitted cardigan over a tweed skirt and brown shirt. 

Keeping true to form, she further layered up with a tartan hooded fleece as she sipped on her hot beverage between scenes. 

Salute: The Crown star appeared in high spirits on the day as she gave an optimistic wave to onlookers

Salute: The Crown star appeared in high spirits on the day as she gave an optimistic wave to onlookers

Wardrobe change: While relaxing from shooting the exhausting scenes, Helena also slipped into a comfy pair of trainers as she took a break from her heels

Wardrobe change: While relaxing from shooting the exhausting scenes, Helena also slipped into a comfy pair of trainers as she took a break from her heels

While relaxing from shooting the exhausting scenes, Helena also slipped into a comfy pair of trainers as she took a break from her heels.

The Crown star appeared in high spirits on the day as she gave an optimistic wave to onlookers. 

Ever the professional, she looked focused as she took direction from a member of the film crew. 

Comfy: Dressed in casual 1940's attire, Helena donned a shin length green knitted cardigan over a tweed skirt and brown shirt

Comfy: Dressed in casual 1940’s attire, Helena donned a shin length green knitted cardigan over a tweed skirt and brown shirt

On set: Ever the professional, Helena looked focused as she took direction from a member of the film crew

On set: Ever the professional, Helena looked focused as she took direction from a member of the film crew

Real life: The upcoming drama that is set during the Holocaust and is ‘inspired by the true story of Nicholas Winton, a London stockbroker

Real life: The upcoming drama that is set during the Holocaust and is ‘inspired by the true story of Nicholas Winton, a London stockbroker

Inspirational: Nicholas Winton was a London stockbroker who devised an elaborate plan to rescue hundreds of children in Czechoslovakia from invading Nazis (pictured in 2003)

Inspirational: Nicholas Winton was a London stockbroker who devised an elaborate plan to rescue hundreds of children in Czechoslovakia from invading Nazis (pictured in 2003) 

Nicholas Winton’s story recently went viral when a YouTube clip revealed an episode of the BBC’s That’s Life from 1988, when Esther Rantzen hosted a special edition featuring him. 

During the broadcast the television presenter, 82, asked, ‘Is there anyone in our audience who owed their life to Nicholas Winton? If so, could you stand up please?’ 

Everyone in the studio audience stood and the episode has been viewed on You Tube many millions of times. 

Jonathan Pryce, Romola Garai, and Alex Sharp are also set to star in the drama, but no release date has yet been announced.

Who was Sir Nicholas Winton? 

Pictured:  Sir Nicholas Winton receiving the Order of White Lion in Prague in 2014

Pictured:  Sir Nicholas Winton receiving the Order of White Lion in Prague in 2014

Dubbed ‘Britain’s Schindler’ for his heroic efforts, Sir Nicholas Winton almost single-handedly saved more than 650 children from death in Nazi concentration camps.

Battling bureaucracy at both ends, Winton arranged trains to carry the children from Nazi-occupied Prague to Britain.

He then kept quiet about his exploits for a half-century – the secret of his selfless efforts undiscovered until 1988 when wife Grete found an old briefcase in the attic containing a scrapbook and in it lists of the children, their parents’ names and the families who gave them a home.

Born in London in 1909 to parents of German Jewish descent, Winton himself was raised as a Christian.

He was a 29-year-old clerk at the London Stock Exchange when a friend contacted him and told him to cancel the skiing holiday they had planned in late 1938 and travel instead to Czechoslovakia.

Horrified by the treatment of the Jews under the Nazi occupation, he set about organising eight evacuations of the threatened children on the Czech Kindertransport train.

He advertised in newspapers for foster homes, organised residency permits from the immigration office in the UK, and persuaded the Germans to let the children go.

Through the British Committee for Refugees from Czechoslovakia (BCRC) he worked around the clock to find British families willing to put up the then large sum of £50 and agree to look after the children until they were 17.

In the months before the outbreak of World War II, eight trains carried children through Germany to Britain.

In all, Winton got 669 children out.

It was Sir Nicholas’s greatest regret that a final train of 250 children, due to depart at the start of September 1939, was prevented from leaving when Poland was invaded. All are believed to have died along with 1.1 million of the Czech Jews at Auschwitz.

Although many more children were saved from Berlin and Vienna, Winton worked almost alone.

 

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk