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How needy parents are the REAL problem with kids checking their phones in school

How needy parents are the REAL problem with kids checking their phones in school

  • A ban on mobile phones in schools is harder on parents than for students  
  • Secondary college principal Pitsa Binnon said parents wanted constant contact
  • She said it was surprising how much parents distracted students with messages  

A ban on mobile phones in schools is harder on parents than students, a principal has claimed.    

Pitsa Binnon, head of Melbourne’s McKinnon Secondary College, told COAG education ministers that she was shocked at how much parents contacted their children throughout the school day. 

‘They need to not communicate with their parents. And their parents need to not communicate with them. And some parents found it very challenging,’ she said according to the Australian Financial Review.  

A ban on mobile phones in schools is harder on parents than students, a principal has claimed 

Melbourne's McKinnon Secondary College (pictured) principal Pitsa Binnon told COAG education ministers that she was shocked at how much parents contacted their children throughout the school day

Melbourne’s McKinnon Secondary College (pictured) principal Pitsa Binnon told COAG education ministers that she was shocked at how much parents contacted their children throughout the school day 

‘I think it’s really important for kids to come to school and be in this bubble for the period of the school day. I’m sure kids will survive till they get home to find out what’s for dinner.’ 

Ms Binnon said the biggest positive she had seen come from the new rule was the noise levels on the playground going up because students were interacting with one another. 

‘It’s healthy and it’s about wellbeing for kids as they’re learning to just disconnect from their phones and to connect in other ways,’ she said. 

Lakes Grammar, located north of the NSW Central Coast, noticed similar benefits after banning students from using their phones during school hours. 

However the biggest positive she had seen come from the new rule was the noise levels on the playground going up because student's were interacting with one another

However the biggest positive she had seen come from the new rule was the noise levels on the playground going up because student’s were interacting with one another

Teaching and Learning Director Michelle Smith said there had been an noticeable increase in interactions.

And students were far more likely to go out onto the oval or play games together, the Daily Telegraph reported.

‘Board games are coming out, cards are out and they are all interacting. We’re even seeing them play hopscotch and the old favourite, duck duck goose. It’s really interesting what they have come up with.

Ms Smith said the school’s ultimate goal was teach students to self-regulate their own usage of electronic devices.   

She said the school decided to put the ban into practice after researching the impact phones had on young people and their ability to learn.

The NSW Government also recently announced it would ban the possession of phones in primary schools from this year.

Victoria has followed a similar path and announced it will ban phones in schools from 2020 in an effort to crackdown on cyberbullying. 

The NSW Government also recently announced it would ban the possession of phones in primary schools from this year

The NSW Government also recently announced it would ban the possession of phones in primary schools from this year

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk