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Isiah Haastrup parents lose High Court bid

The parents of Isaiah Haastrup have spoken of their agony after losing an appeal to continue life support for their brain-damaged baby.

The High Court ruled earlier this year ruled that the 12-month-old could be allowed to die against his parents’ wishes.

Specialists at King’s College Hospital in London where Isaiah is being treated said giving further intensive care treatment to the little boy was ‘futile, burdensome and not in his best interests’ and suggested only palliative care.

The Court of Appeal has now upheld that decision and denied his parents’ permission to appeal. 

The parents claim there are treatments that could save their son, who they say is ‘responsive’ and have announced they intend to take their fight to the European Court of Human Rights.  

Isaiah Haastrup’s father Lanre Haastrup and mother Takesha Thomas leave the Royal Courts of Justice, London, after losing the latest round of a life-support battle over their disabled son

Speaking outside court, Isaiah's father Lanre - who has been banned from seeing his son due to concerns over his behaviour - spoke out about his disappointment at the decision 

Speaking outside court, Isaiah’s father Lanre – who has been banned from seeing his son due to concerns over his behaviour – spoke out about his disappointment at the decision 

Isaiah suffered 'catastrophic' brain damage due to being deprived of oxygen at birth

Isaiah suffered ‘catastrophic’ brain damage due to being deprived of oxygen at birth

PARENTS’ FIGHT FOR BABY ISAIAH

Isaiah was born at King’s College Hospital in London last February and suffered brain damage after a medical emergency meant he was deprived of oxygen during his birth.

His mother Takesha Thomas had to undergo an emergency Caesarean after her womb ruptured, and Isaiah was delivered with no heartbeat and not breathing and had to be resuscitated.

An expert paediatric neurologist said he was ‘as near to death as it is possible to get’ and the High Court heard the lack of oxygen caused a ‘catastrophic’ level of brain damage which left him profoundly disabled.

Doctors said he needed a ventilator to breathe, could not move independently or respond to stimulus and had a ‘low level of consciousness’.

If he had any awareness of pain or pleasure he was likely to be experiencing pain, the court was told.

Doctors suggested taking him off life support six days after his birth, after tests revealed the damage to his brain.

Miss Thomas, 36, told the court she accepted Isaiah was severely disabled but insisted she was willing to care for him for the rest of his life. She told the court her faith as a Pentecostal Christian meant she believed God should decide who lived or died.

She said Isaiah responded to her voice and touch, and to his favourite cuddly toy or cartoons. 

Isaiah has remained on life support at King’s College Hospital and a judge previously said there had been a breakdown in trust between the parents and his medical team.

Mr Haastrup, a lawyer, said Isaiah’s brain damage was the fault of medical failings during his birth and the family launched a separate legal action against the hospital for alleged clinical negligence.  

A legal challenge in the Court of Appeal was mounted after a High Court ruled that doctors could stop providing life-support to Isaiah.  

Both Mr Haastrup and the boy’s mother, Takesha Thomas, both from Peckham, south-east London, wanted the treatment to continue.

Despite their pleas, Mr Justice MacDonald ruled in favour of the hospital bosses.

Speaking outside court, Isaiah’s father Lanre – who has been banned from seeing his son due to concerns over his behaviour – spoke out about his disappointment at the decision. 

He said: ‘No one else will stand up for Isaiah so we have to. 

‘It is more compounded when you cannot see your son on what may be his last few days on Earth.

‘Our son was negligently harmed and I am currently banned from seeing him which is even worse. 

‘The hospital should be ashamed of the way they have treated us.

‘How can you ban me from seeing my son despite having a judgment in there to kill him – for him to die.

‘It’s really sad – it’s a sad day – where are we going in this country that a father has been banned with no criminal act?

‘We weren’t heard and we haven’t heard what the experts have to say about this.

‘I respect our court system but I think they got it wrong on this occasion.’ 

He added: ‘We know what our son does, they got it wrong and the hospital is trying to cover it up.

‘They haven’t told us when they will switch off life support – but it might be in the next few days so I have to quickly go home and see what we can do to stop that. 

‘They shouldn’t rush to kill him, to end his life.

‘We have to fight [until the very end] we haven’t even been heard today. The court has rushed in to say ‘no’.’ 

Mr Haastrup has also lost a legal fight after being barred from visiting King’s College Hospital.  

Speaking outside the Court today, Mr Haastrup said: 'No one else will stand up for Isaiah so we have to'

Speaking outside the Court today, Mr Haastrup said: ‘No one else will stand up for Isaiah so we have to’

Mr Haastrup has also lost a legal fight after being barred from visiting King’s College Hospital

Mr Haastrup has also lost a legal fight after being barred from visiting King’s College Hospital

He had asked a High Court judge to overturn a ban imposed by hospital bosses but Mr Justice Mostyn on Thursday dismissed his application. 

Lawyers representing hospital bosses said Mr Haastrup had lost his temper at the hospital during the evening of February 17 and been threatening towards staff. 

Mr Haastrup claimed he had done ‘nothing wrong’ and that his young son could die within days.   

Lanre Hasstrup, left, pictured with his partner Takesha Thomas, right, was barred by staff from King's College Hospital in London where their infant son Isaiah is being treated

Lanre Hasstrup, left, pictured with his partner Takesha Thomas, right, was barred by staff from King’s College Hospital in London where their infant son Isaiah is being treated

Mr Haastrup said earlier this week: ‘I have a right to see my son. 

‘If he dies without me seeing him I would be irreparably damaged. 

‘I just had a conversation. Certain people seem not to want to hear what I have to say.’ 

The judge said Mr Haastrup had not demonstrated any legal error by hospital bosses or shown that they had acted irrationally.  



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



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