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Ja Rule DISMISSED from Fyre Festival class action fraud lawsuit along with Grant Margolin

While Ja Rule was among the most prominent names involved with the controversial Fyre Festival, a judge has dismissed him from a class action lawsuit.

Bloomberg reports that both the 43-year-old rapper (real name Jeffrey Bruce Atkins) and Fyre Fest chief marketing officer Grant Margolin were dismissed from the suit by a federal court on Wednesday.

There was a conflicting report from TMZ that alleged Rule had tried to get the lawsuit dismissed, but ‘came up short,’ but that report was inaccurate, according to Ryan Smith, an attorney for Ja Rule.

Caught Up: Ja Rule’s attempt to get a class action lawsuit regarding his notorious Fyre Festival thrown out of court has failed; seen in July

‘Mr. Atkins is thankful for today’s ruling and for the Court’s time and attention. Justice was done today,’ Smith said in a statement about Wednesday’s ruling.    

The plaintiffs alleged that both Rule and Margolin made false representations about the festival and its accommodations, although they knew for months they would not be able to deliver what they promised.

Judge P. Kevin Castel wrote for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York that there were no specific promises made in Rule’s tweets.

'The stage is set!!! In less than 24 hours, the first annual Fyre Festival begins. #festivallife,' Rule's tweet read; seen in February

‘The stage is set!!! In less than 24 hours, the first annual Fyre Festival begins. #festivallife,’ Rule’s tweet read; seen in February

‘The subjective qualifiers of “FOMO-inducing” and “Coachella x 1000” are too exaggerated, blustering, and boasting for a reasonable consumer to rely on,’ Castel wrote.

The court found no fraudulent statements were specifically made by Margolin either, thus dismissing him from the lawsuit as well.   

‘Broad assertions of reliance on multiple misstatements covering at least a four-month period of time are insufficient,’ Castel added.

While Rule and Margolin have been dismissed, the lawsuit will continue against embattled Fyre Festival founder Billy McFarland.

The festival reached new levels of infamy with a pair of documentaries, Netflix’ Fyre and Hulu’s Fyre Fraud, which both debuted just days apart in January 2019.

The suit was filed by high-profile lawyer Mark Geragos, which claims that Rule, McFarland and other Fyre organizers warned celebs like Bella Hadid not to attend.

Disaster: The lawsuit claims that Rule and the organizers knew the festival would be a disaster, though Rule claimed otherwise

Disaster: The lawsuit claims that Rule and the organizers knew the festival would be a disaster, though Rule claimed otherwise

The lawsuit claims that Rule and the organizers knew the festival would be a disaster, though Rule claimed otherwise.

In a TMZ interview from Los Angeles, while fans were still stranded at the fest, Rule said his priority was, ‘getting everyone off the island SAFE.’

‘I’m heartbroken … it was NOT A SCAM as everyone is reporting. I don’t know how everything went so left but I’m working to make it right by making sure everyone is refunded,’ he said at the time.

Not a scam: 'I'm heartbroken ... it was NOT A SCAM as everyone is reporting. I don't know how everything went so left but I'm working to make it right by making sure everyone is refunded,' he said at the time; seen in November

Not a scam: ‘I’m heartbroken … it was NOT A SCAM as everyone is reporting. I don’t know how everything went so left but I’m working to make it right by making sure everyone is refunded,’ he said at the time; seen in November

The lawsuit, which was filed in May 2017, claimed that fans plunked down anywhere between $1,200 to $100,000 to attend the fest and were left with shoddy amenities including the now infamous cheese sandwich dinner with FEMA emergency tent accommodations.

The concert-goer who filed the suit is seeking upwards of $100 million in damages in the class-action suit. 

If the suit keeps going forward, it could cost Ja Rule, Billy McFarland and the other Fyre Festival organizers considerably.

Lawsuit: The lawsuit, which was filed in May 2017, claimed that fans plunked down anywhere between $1,200 to $100,000 to attend the fest and were left with shoddy amenities including the now infamous cheese sandwich dinner with FEMA emergency tent accommodations

Lawsuit: The lawsuit, which was filed in May 2017, claimed that fans plunked down anywhere between $1,200 to $100,000 to attend the fest and were left with shoddy amenities including the now infamous cheese sandwich dinner with FEMA emergency tent accommodations

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk