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Jason Watkins discusses death of his daughter Maude, 2

Jason Watkins has discussed the death of his daughter Maude and how it releated to his role in new Channel 5 series The Catch.

The actor, 60, appeared on BBC’s The One Show to discuss his role in the show, where he plays a fisherman struggling with the death of his son in an accident several years before.

Jason, who lost Maude on New Year’s Day in 2011, said he thought the show would be a good way of getting to ‘express’ his grief and hopefully help others.

Interview: Jason Watkins has discussed the death of his daughter Maude and how it releated to his role in new Channel 5 series The Catch

He said: ‘I always wanted, and my wife Clara, we lost our daughter Maude to sepsis in 2011. We’re part of bereavement charities but one always wants to express oneself if you’re an artist to things that really matter. 

‘Along came this script about a regular guy who’d lost a child and how it traumatised him and affected him and how he tried to cope with him.’

Jason said there were a few scenes he found ‘very difficult’ to film but considers himself lucky he got to tell such a story.

He said: ‘Perhaps it’s a male thing, that men perhaps try and cope: “I’m not going to go there, I’m not going to be emotional.” 

Family: Jason, who lost Maude on New Year's Day in 2011, said he thought the show would be a good way of getting to 'express' his grief and hopefully help others

Family: Jason, who lost Maude on New Year’s Day in 2011, said he thought the show would be a good way of getting to ‘express’ his grief and hopefully help others

‘I think that’s where men struggle mentally. Ed does that. I knew what I was taking on.

‘There are two or three scenes that were very difficult to film but we’re lucky as actors that we can share our stories in a way and hope that connects with the audience.’

In 2010 a persistent cough and consequent respiratory problems prompted two consecutive visits to a hospital A&E, where Maude was initially diagnosed with croup, a type of respiratory infection. 

But within two weeks of developing her first symptoms she had died. She had in fact fallen victim to sepsis, an insidious illness in which the immune system reacts violently to infection, attacks its own tissue and eventually leads to organ failure. 

Role: The actor appeared on BBC’s The One Show to discuss his role in the show, where he plays a fisherman struggling with the death of his son in an accident several years before

Candid: Jason said there were a few scenes he found 'very difficult' to film but considers himself lucky he got to tell such a story

Candid: Jason said there were a few scenes he found ‘very difficult’ to film but considers himself lucky he got to tell such a story

He said: 'I always wanted, and my wife Clara, we lost our daughter Maude to sepsis in 2011. We're part of bereavement charities but one always wants to express oneself if you're an artist to things that really matter'

He said: ‘I always wanted, and my wife Clara, we lost our daughter Maude to sepsis in 2011. We’re part of bereavement charities but one always wants to express oneself if you’re an artist to things that really matter’

Sepsis, known as the ‘silent killer’, strikes when an infection such as blood poisoning sparks a violent immune response in which the body attacks its own organs. 

If caught early enough, it’s easily treated with intravenous antibiotics and fluids, but these must be given as soon as sepsis is suspected – it strikes with frightening speed and, for every hour of delay, a patient’s chance of dying increases 8 per cent. 

Earlier this month, the star and wife Clara marked 12 years since Maude’s death, with Jason also sharing a heartfelt tribute to his girl on Twitter.

Detailing how they marked the occasion, he told The Mirrror: ‘Clara and I both get quite emotional on that day and in the lead-up to the anniversary. We just walk to her bench as a family, and with friends, then everyone comes back to our house. It’s a nice thing to do.’

So sad: In 2010 a persistent cough prompted two consecutive visits to a hospital A&E, where Maude was initially diagnosed with croup but two week later died from sepsis

So sad: In 2010 a persistent cough prompted two consecutive visits to a hospital A&E, where Maude was initially diagnosed with croup but two week later died from sepsis

Couple: Earlier this month, the star and wife Clara marked 12 years since Maude's death, with Jason also sharing a heartfelt tribute to his girl on Twitter (pictured 2019)

Couple: Earlier this month, the star and wife Clara marked 12 years since Maude’s death, with Jason also sharing a heartfelt tribute to his girl on Twitter (pictured 2019)

In an interview in 2020, Jason revealed he was ‘angry for a long time’ at fate for taking the child he shared with his wife Clara Francis. 

Speaking to The Sunday Times Magazine, he said: ‘Clara and I felt cheated.’ 

He described the pattern of his grief changing over time, from an acute pain to a ‘heart-shaped feeling that you carry around for ever.’ 

Jason and Clara – who already had an older daughter Bessie – decided to try for another child after Maude’s death. 

He added: ‘Life was not going to rob us of our happiness. And Gilbert has brought us so much happiness.’ 

What are the key symptoms of sepsis? The ‘silent killer’ that can cause death in minutes

Sepsis, known as the ‘silent killer’, strikes when an infection such as blood poisoning sparks a violent immune response in which the body attacks its own organs. 

It is a potentially life-threatening condition, triggered by an infection or injury.  Around 245,000 people develop sepsis in the UK each year and 52,000 die, according to the UK Sepsis Trust.

Instead of attacking the invading bug, the body turns on itself, shutting down vital organs.

If caught early enough, it’s easily treated with intravenous antibiotics and fluids, but these must be given as soon as sepsis is suspected – it strikes with frightening speed and, for every hour of delay, a patient’s chance of dying increases 8 per cent.

Sepsis is a leading cause of avoidable death killing 44,000 people each year

Sepsis is a leading cause of avoidable death killing 44,000 people each year

The early symptoms of sepsis can be easily confused with more mild conditions, meaning it can be difficult to diagnose. 

A high temperature (fever), chills and shivering, a fast heartbeat and rapid breathing are also indicators. 

A patient can rapidly deteriorate if sepsis is missed early on, so quick diagnosis and treatment is vital – yet this rarely happens. 

In the early stages, sepsis can be mistaken for a chest infection, flu or upset stomach. 

It is most common and dangerous in older adults, pregnant women, children younger than one, people with chronic conditions or those who have weakened immune systems.  

The six signs of something potentially deadly can be identified by the acronym ‘SEPSIS’:

  • Slurred speech or confusion
  • Extreme shivering or muscle pain
  • Passing no urine in a day
  • Severe breathlessness
  • Skin that’s mottled or discoloured  

Anyone who develops any of these symptoms should seek medical help urgently — and ask doctors: ‘Could this be sepsis?’ 

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



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