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Jimmy Savile victim blasts BBC’s decision to make drama out of paedophile’s life

A victim of Jimmy Savile has blasted the BBC over its upcoming new drama about the paedophile presenter’s life – branding it a ‘travesty in the making’.

Steven George, 69, born Alison Pink before a sex change, was abused by the Top of the Pops host at the age of 17 while undergoing treatment at Broadmoor Hospital in 1969.

He has now blasted the broadcasting corporation for turning ‘their own failure’ to catch the disgraced star into a drama called The Reckoning which will star Steve Coogan.  

The controversial drama will trace the presenter’s upbringing, early career and prolific child sex offences and the BBC has previously said it would work with Savile’s victims to portray the story ‘with sensitivity and respect’.

But Mr George said he has been completely ignored by the programme makers despite ‘trying to blow the whistle on Savile while he was still alive’. 

He said: ‘The BBC should be ashamed of themselves. They covered up for Savile even after he was dead and now this.

‘They are making an entertainment out of their own failure to catch him and that is what is really insulting.

Steven George, 69, born Alison Pink before a sex change, was abused by Jimmy Savile at the age of 17 while undergoing treatment at Broadmoor Hospital in 1969

The controversial drama called The Reckoning will trace Savile's upbringing, early career and prolific child sex offences

The controversial drama called The Reckoning will trace Savile’s upbringing, early career and prolific child sex offences 

‘The only reason I will be watching is to see how bad it is. It sounds like a travesty in the making.

‘To those who suffered at the hands of Savile it will not be entertainment. I will be like reliving a nightmare.

‘I have just written an article called ”15 years with Jimmy Savile”. They should make a drama out of that.’      

The BBC has said it had contacted Savile’s victims to ensure that the portrayal of events was accurate and sympathetic.

But Mr George, from Portsmouth, claimed the corporation ‘have not been in touch at all’.

He continued: ‘They have ignored me. They have not been in touch at all. I tried to help people blow the whistle on Savile when he was still alive.

‘The BBC covered up and covered up when they knew exactly what he was doing. They should not be involved in turning that into entertainment because it is a clear clash of interests.

‘If there is to be a drama, it should be produced by film makers completely independent of the BBC.

‘They are boosting their own viewing figures with their version of what happened and it makes me hopping mad.’

Mr George was abused by Savile while watching television at Broadmoor Hospital when he was 17. 

He previously described how the disgraced presenter was given the keys to the hospital and treated like a member of staff. 

Mr George (pictured as a child) was abused by the disgraced presenter while watching television at Broadmoor Hospital

Mr George (pictured as a child) was abused by the disgraced presenter while watching television at Broadmoor Hospital

The disgraced presenter was given the keys to Broadmoor Hospital (pictured) and treated like a member of staff, according to Mr George

The disgraced presenter was given the keys to Broadmoor Hospital (pictured) and treated like a member of staff, according to Mr George

This month BBC drama boss Piers Wenger defended the channel’s controversial upcoming series and sought to quell concerns that the Steve Coogan-fronted series had been commissioned too soon after Savile’s crimes came to light.

Mr Wenger said: ‘It’s a decade since Jimmy Savile died [and] it will be a decade next year since his behaviours first came into the public eye. Our primary intention with the drama is to give voice to the victims.’

He continued: ‘[We want to tell] their stories sensitively and with the utmost respect. 

‘There are still many important questions that need to be answered about Savile, so I think it’s incredibly important that the BBC tell that story.’ 

Meanwhile actor Steve Coogan, who famously portrays fictional comedic character Alan Partridge, explained the decision to play Savile was not one ‘I took lightly’.

He said: ‘Neil McKay has written an intelligent script tackling sensitively a horrific story which, however harrowing, needs to be told.’

Steve Coogan, who famously portrays fictional comedic character Alan Partridge, explained the decision to play Savile was not one 'I took lightly'

Steve Coogan, who famously portrays fictional comedic character Alan Partridge, explained the decision to play Savile was not one ‘I took lightly’

Andrew Chan for Nottingham based Delight Counselling said: ‘Most survivors of sexual trauma and abuse can be triggered by sexual abuse stories shown by the media, and this new Jimmy Saville TV drama is no different.

‘Portrayals of sexual violence in the media including TV shows and movies can prompt negative reactions for victims including anxiety, feelings of sadness or irritability, and even flashbacks.’

‘We understand that the recent news of the Jimmy Saville TV drama may be upsetting to victims of sexual trauma and abuse, and we urge those people to seek help during this time.

‘If you have been affected the first step is to talk to a professional about what you encountered.

‘They will be able to help you cope with the emotions you’re currently feeling and will also help you regain control back over your life by helping you cope with what happened.’  

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘The team are working closely with many people whose lives were impacted by Savile to ensure their stories are told with sensitivity and respect, and the drama will also draw on extensive and wide-ranging research sources.

‘It will examine the impact his appalling crimes had on his victims and the powerlessness many felt when they tried to raise the alarm.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk