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Kookaburra is seen swimming inside a woman’s pool in Ipswich, Queensland

Have you ever seen a kookaburra swim? One of Australia’s favourite native birds is spotted doing laps in an outdoor pool

  • Gayle Guilk spotted the bird swimming in her pool at her home in Ipswich, QLD
  • She said she’s had several kookaburras visit her house and take dips in the pool
  • Residents are urged to check on the birds as they can drown if they’re too wet  

Incredible images captured the moment a curious kookaburra decided to take a dip in a woman’s backyard swimming pool.

Gayle Guilk spotted the Australian native bird swimming in her backyard earlier this month at her home in Ipswich, south-west of Brisbane.

The kookaburra can be seen diving into the pool and then sunning itself on the pool fence.

Ms Guilk shared the photos to a native birds Facebook group and confirmed the kookaburra wasn’t in any danger but just simply wanted to cool down on a hot day.

Gayle Guilk spotted the bird swimming in her backyard earlier this month at her home in Ipswich, south-west of Brisbane

She said she’s had a group of several kookaburras visit her home over the past few years and often hears a splash outside only to find them bathing themselves.

‘They visit a bit and they all seem to swim the same way, but I do watch to make sure I don’t have to jump in to help them out,’ she said. 

The photos were flooded with comments from many Australians revealing they have also seen kookaburras take a dive in their swimming pools.

Adorable pictures show the kookaburra diving into the pool and then sunning itself on the fence at the Queensland home

Adorable pictures show the kookaburra diving into the pool and then sunning itself on the fence at the Queensland home

‘Many times I’ve been swimming in our pool and have been joined by the local kookies,’ one wrote.

‘We have a pair that regularly come for a bath in our pool too,’ another said.

Kookaburras are part of the kingfisher bird group and are known to often bathe themselves in water. 

Residents who spot birds in their pools are urged to keep an eye on them as they can become too wet and heavy to then fly back onto land.

Some Australians have sadly found drowned kookaburras in their backyards.

While kookaburras typically prefer to feast on rodents and worms rather than fish, they can also take goldfish from backyard ponds. 

Kookaburras have been known to take dips in residents' swimming pools but they can drown if they become too wet and heavy to fly back out

Kookaburras have been known to take dips in residents’ swimming pools but they can drown if they become too wet and heavy to fly back out

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk