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Kourtney Kardashian engagement dinner gives Australian fine dining restaurants a run for their money

How many of these fancy food items do YOU know? As Kourtney Kardashian’s engagement menu leaves thousands stumped – these are some of the swankiest items on high-end Aussie menus

  • Travis Barker and Kourtney Kardashian marked engagement with a lavish dinner
  • The couple treated their families to dishes like ‘Penryn salad’ and ‘vellutata’
  • Some of Australia’s finest restaurants serve even more perplexing dishes 


After Travis Barker dropped down on one knee and asked Kourtney Kardashian to be his ‘forever’, ‘Kravis’ treated their famous families to an extravagant candlelit dinner at the Rosewood Miramar Hotel in Montecito, California.

Choices from the lavish Italian smorgasbord included ‘Penryn Orchard Pears Salad’, ‘Buratta and Persimmon’ or ‘Weiser Farm Honeynut Squash Vellutata’ to start, followed by ‘Lobster Taglioni’ and ‘Plant-Based Cacio e Pepe’ for main.

While many of the dishes left fans scratching their heads, some of Australia’s swankiest restaurants are serving even more perplexing creations on their fine-dining menus.

 After Travis Barker dropped down on one knee and asked Kourtney Kardashian to be his ‘forever’, ‘Kravis’ (right) treated their famous families to an extravagant candlelit dinner (left)

How many of these upscale menu items did you know? 

Pandanus: a native Australian fruit with an oily, nutty seed best eaten roasted

Jamon Iberico de Bellota: free-range Spanish ham

Matsutake: a Japanese pine mushroom

Kangaroo tsukune: kangaroo meatballs

Kombu cracker: crispy seaweed

Pickled wakame: sea mustard

Before closing its doors due to the crippling impact of the pandemic, MasterChef Australia judge Jock Zonfrillo's restaurant Orana served things like matsutake, a Japanese pine mushroom (pictured)

And 'Jamon Iberico de Bellota' - free-range Spanish ham (pictured)

 Before closing its doors due to the crippling impact of the pandemic, MasterChef Australia judge Jock Zonfrillo’s restaurant Orana served things like matsutake, a Japanese pine mushroom (left) and ‘Jamon Iberico de Bellota’ – free-range Spanish ham

Marron: crayfish

Nasturtium buds: edible flowers

Garum: a fermented fish sauce traditionally popular in Greece

Sudachi: a small, round, green citrus fruit of Japanese origin

Fleur de sel: sea salt (flower of salt)

Vellutata: a savoury sauce made from roux and a light stock

Before closing its doors due to the crippling impact of the pandemic, MasterChef Australia judge Jock Zonfrillo’s restaurant Orana served things like pandanus, a native Australian fruit with an oily, nutty seed best eaten roasted.

The upscale Adelaide eatery also offered diners gooseneck barnacles, a traditional Spanish crustacean, ‘Jamon Iberico de Bellota’ – free-range Spanish ham – and matsutake, a Japanese pine mushroom.

Another popular choice was kangaroo tsukune – kangaroo meatballs. 

Further north in the heart of Sydney CBD, five-star seafood restaurant Cirrus is still serving eclectic dishes featuring things like Kombu crackers, which are crispy pieces of seaweed, and pickled wakame – a rare type of sea mustard.

Diners at the waterfront eatery in Barangaroo can also enjoy plates of fresh marron, a species of crayfish from Western Australia. 

Gooseneck barnacles (pictured), a traditional Spanish crustacean

Garum, a fermented fish sauce traditionally popular in Greece

Gooseneck barnacles (left), a traditional Spanish crustacean, and garum (right), a fermented fish sauce traditionally popular in Greece

Just a few kilometres east, award-winning Quay restaurant has some of the most baffling options of all.

The three-hatted venue serves capers on a bed of nasturtium buds, an edible flower that is a staple in high-end eateries around the world. 

Also on the menu are garum, a fermented fish sauce traditionally popular in Greece, and sudachi, a small, round, green citrus fruit of Japanese origin. 

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk