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Lawsuit by Trump supporter who says he was not served by NYC bar is tossed

Greg Piatek, 31 (pictured), a Trump supporter who sued a New York City bar for discrimination after he was thrown out for wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat has lost his lawsuit

A Trump supporter who sued a New York City bar for discrimination after he was thrown out for wearing a ‘Make America Great Again’ hat has lost his lawsuit.

Philadelphia accountant Greg Piatek, 31, claims the staff of The Happiest Hour in Manhattan said he wasn’t welcome because he and his friends supported the Republican president. 

He sued the West Village bar claiming the incident ‘offended his sense of being American’. 

But Justice David Cohen tossed the lawsuit on Wednesday saying the law doesn’t protect against political discrimination.

According to the New York Post, Piatek said he and his friends visited the September 11 Memorial in January 2017.

He then claimed the bar staff refused to serve after seeing Piatek in the MAGA hat.

Piatek claims that after he and his friends complained about the rude service, the staff said: ‘Anyone who supports Trump – or believes in what you believe – is not welcome here! And you need to leave right now because we won’t serve you!’

Paul Liggieri, Piatek’s attorney, said his client’s hat was a ‘spiritual tribute’ to September 11 victims and that he should be protected under an anti-discrimination statute.

The bar’s attorney, Elizabeth Conway, said Piatek did not face discrimination because only religious beliefs, not political ones, are protected under state and city discrimination law.

‘Supporting Trump is not a religion,’ Conway argued.

The bar's attorney, Elizabeth Conway, said Piatek did not face discrimination because only religious beliefs, not political ones, are protected under state and city discrimination law

The bar’s attorney, Elizabeth Conway, said Piatek did not face discrimination because only religious beliefs, not political ones, are protected under state and city discrimination law

Paul Liggieri, Piatek's attorney, said his client's hat was a 'spiritual tribute' to September 11 victims and that he should be protected under an anti-discrimination statute (Pictured,  Trump in August 2015)

Paul Liggieri, Piatek’s attorney, said his client’s hat was a ‘spiritual tribute’ to September 11 victims and that he should be protected under an anti-discrimination statute (Pictured,  Trump in August 2015)

Cohen seemed to agree and said the incident was no more than a ‘petty slight’

‘Plaintiff does not state any faith-based principle to which the hat relates,’ Cohen said. 

Piatek has been for an unspecified amount for ’emotional damage’. His attorney lawyer told The New York Post he’ll decide on whether or not to appeal. 

Jon Neidich, owner of The Happiest Hour denies that Piatek was kicked out and said he ‘was sufficiently pleased with his service at the bar [and] that he added’ a $36 tip onto the $186 tab, according to the New York Post.  

Neidech called Piatek’s lawsuit a ‘publicity stunt’ and the claims ‘outrageous and disparaging’.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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