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Lebanese protesters threaten more violence – as as shocking video shows moment of massive explosion

Furious protesters in Lebanon have threatened further violence after a night of street clashes in which they stormed several ministries.

The city of Beirut was shaken by a deadly explosion on August 4 and though the exact circumstances that led to the blast are as yet unknown.

Despite this, many in Lebanon blame the corruption and incompetence of their government for allowing the explosion which has so far killed 158.

Furious protesters in Lebanon have threatened further violence after a night of street clashes in which they stormed several ministries following the devastating explosion in Beirut on August 4

French experts working at the scene of the explosion say that the crater left by the explosion measures as large as 43-metre (141 foot) deep

French experts working at the scene of the explosion say that the crater left by the explosion measures as large as 43-metre (141 foot) deep

A staggering 6,000 people were left injured by the blast which created a mushroom cloud that reminded many of an atomic bomb.

Mobile phone footage has also emerged on social media showing the moment of the explosion in high definition slow motion.

Agoston Nemeth, 42, recorded the footage on the terrace of his home, only 850ft from the explosion site.

Loud rumbling can be heard in the video as black smoke engulfs the sky, before a huge mushroom cloud and visible blast wave blows out the windows, rushing towards the camera and knocking it over.

Describing his experience of the explosion, Nemeth said: ‘It was something I could not get away from. I experienced this white-hot glass exploding. 

One message circulated on social media by angry protesters said: 'Prepare the gallows because our anger doesn't end in one day'

One message circulated on social media by angry protesters said: ‘Prepare the gallows because our anger doesn’t end in one day’

Rescue teams search for missing people today near the site of the explosion that hit the seaport of Beirut, Lebanon

Rescue teams search for missing people today near the site of the explosion that hit the seaport of Beirut, Lebanon

‘I don’t know if I jumped or the shock waves pushed me, and I found myself on the floor. I don’t know how much time passed. 

‘I noticed shattering glass and people screaming. I looked around and saw this huge orange cloud above me 

A security official who was citing French experts working at the site of the disaster said that a a 43-metre (141 foot) deep crater had been left at Beirut’s port.

One message circulated on social media by angry protesters said: ‘Prepare the gallows because our anger doesn’t end in one day.’

The protesters’s anger has re-ignited calls from demonstrations last year calling for the wholesale removal of Lebanon’s leadership.

The army was forced to deploy tear gas and rubber bullets to try and clear the crowds of protesters from Martyrs’ Square after street violence left 65 people injured, according to the Red Cross. 

Demonstrators clash with police during a protest against the political elites and the government last night

Demonstrators clash with police during a protest against the political elites and the government last night

Tear gas and rubber bullets were used by the Lebanese army to try and break up crowds of protesters last night

Tear gas and rubber bullets were used by the Lebanese army to try and break up crowds of protesters last night 

Demonstrates even occupied the foreign ministry's building temporarily before being forced out by the army after three hours. Pictured: protesters and riot police clash in Beirut yesterday

Demonstrates even occupied the foreign ministry’s building temporarily before being forced out by the army after three hours. Pictured: protesters and riot police clash in Beirut yesterday 

Information minister Manal Abdel Samad (pictured) has left office and apologised to the Lebanese people for having failed them

Information minister Manal Abdel Samad (pictured) has left office and apologised to the Lebanese people for having failed them

Demonstrates even occupied the foreign ministry’s building temporarily before being forced out by the army after three hours.

The economy and energy ministries were also stormed this weekend by protesters brandishing nooses. 

The head of Lebanon’s Maronite church patriarch Beshara Rai joined the chorus of angry voices and said the blast could be ‘described as a crime against humanity’.

And today has seen the first Lebanese minister resign from government in response to the public outcry.

Information minister Manal Abdel Samad left office and apologised to the Lebanese people for having failed them.

People ride past damaged cars earlier today in a neighbourhood near the scene of the explosion

People ride past damaged cars earlier today in a neighbourhood near the scene of the explosion

A car drives past the site of the explosion earlier today. The explosion left as many as 6,000 people injured

A car drives past the site of the explosion earlier today. The explosion left as many as 6,000 people injured 

Local media suggest that more ministers will also resign but the government will wait to see how many personnel depart before potentially announcing its own resignation.

Lebanon Prime Minister Hassan Diab said Saturday he would propose early elections to break the impasse that is plunging Lebanon ever deeper into political and economic crisis.

In a televised address he said: ‘We can’t exit the country’s structural crisis without holding early parliamentary elections.’

Meanwhile, French President Emmanuel Macron has overseen a UN’back conference to raise aid for Lebanon and said that the world mys respond ‘quickly and effectively’ to the disaster.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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