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Love letter penned by Queen Victoria to Prince Albert on the day they got engaged is published

A love letter from Queen Victoria begging Prince Albert to sneak a moment alone together on the day of their engagement is to be shown to the public for the first time.

The brief note, written in German on a sheet of fine pale blue paper, is one of five letters exchanged between the couple that day.

In his letters to her, Prince Albert wrote of his disbelief that they were to be together and promised to make her ‘quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!’.  

The love notes, which are dated October 15, 1839 – two years after Victoria ascended the throne – were written at Windsor Castle.

They reveal how desperate the couple was to be together in the hours after the Queen proposed marriage.

The letters also highlight the importance of the written word in the 19th century, and how they had to communicate by letter despite being in the same building. 

One of the Queen’s letters, bearing her gilt cypher, simply says: ‘Dearest Albert, Can you come to me alone for a moment? Your devoted V[ictoria].’

A love letter from Queen Victoria begging Prince Albert to sneak a moment alone together on the day of their engagement is to be shown to the public for the first time. Pictured: The couple in  1854

The brief note, written in German on a sheet of fine pale blue paper, is one of five letters exchanged between the couple on October 15, 1839

The brief note, written in German on a sheet of fine pale blue paper, is one of five letters exchanged between the couple on October 15, 1839

In his letters to her, Prince Albert wrote of his disbelief that they were to be together and promised to make her 'quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!' Pictured: The couple portrayed on their wedding day

In his letters to her, Prince Albert wrote of his disbelief that they were to be together and promised to make her ‘quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!’ Pictured: The couple portrayed on their wedding day

The love notes, scribbled two years after Victoria ascended the throne, were written at Windsor Castle.

The love notes, scribbled two years after Victoria ascended the throne, were written at Windsor Castle.

Another emphasises the love they shared. Written by Albert, on plain cream notepaper, it states: ‘My dearest, most beloved Victoria. 

‘I am so touched by the evidence of trust that you give me in sending your letters, and by the so affectionate sentiments that you express towards me therein, that I scarcely know how to reply to you. 

‘How have I earned so much love and so much warm-hearted kindness?

‘I am still unable to accustom myself to the truth of all that I see and hear and can only believe that Heaven has sent down an angel to me, whose radiance is intended to brighten my life. 

‘May I succeed in making you quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!! With body and soul I remain for ever your slave. Your devoted Albert.’

The correspondence marks a turning point in the relationship between the cousins, who were brought to life by Jenna Coleman and Tom Hughes in ITV hit series Victoria.

While they had previously corresponded in English, they began to write in German, a language which the Queen had spoken until the age of three.

And Victoria began to address her fiancé as ‘angel’, a term of endearment she used throughout their marriage.

The billet-doux have been carefully stored in the Royal Archives, at Windsor Castle, since it was created by George V in 1912.

They are among a selection of 23,500 papers and collections of Albert being digitised for the first time.

The first tranche is being published this summer to mark the bicentenary of the couple’s birth.

Written by Albert, on plain cream notepaper, it states: ‘My dearest, most beloved Victoria... How have I earned so much love and so much warm-hearted kindness?' Pictured in 1854

Written by Albert, on plain cream notepaper, it states: ‘My dearest, most beloved Victoria… How have I earned so much love and so much warm-hearted kindness?’ Pictured in 1854

He went on (above): ‘May I succeed in making you quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!! With body and soul I remain for ever your slave. Your devoted Albert’

He went on (above): ‘May I succeed in making you quite quite happy, as happy as you deserve to be!! With body and soul I remain for ever your slave. Your devoted Albert’

While the couple had previously corresponded in English, they began to write in German, a language which the Queen had spoken until the age of three. Victoria began to address her fiancé as ‘angel’ (above) a term of endearment she used throughout their marriage

While the couple had previously corresponded in English, they began to write in German, a language which the Queen had spoken until the age of three. Victoria began to address her fiancé as ‘angel’ (above) a term of endearment she used throughout their marriage

The billet-doux have been carefully stored in the Royal Archives, at Windsor Castle, since it was created by George V in 1912

The billet-doux have been carefully stored in the Royal Archives, at Windsor Castle, since it was created by George V in 1912

But, because they are pasted in volumes, rather than individual letters, they are difficult to display to the public.

Instead, facsimiles will go on show this weekend at the Goethe-Institut to coincide with The Great Exhibition Road Festival, in London’s museum district.

Bill Stockting, Archives Manager at the Royal Archives, said: ‘These are charming letters that Victoria and Albert wrote to each other on the day they got engaged.

‘They would both have been in the Castle, had just got engaged and there was a flurry of excitement on that particular day.

‘Up until then, they wrote to each other in English and Victoria tended to write to her cousins as “my dear Albert” or “my dear Ernst”.

‘But after that day they switched to German and Victoria began calling her fiancé “Angel”. There was only one Angel and that was Albert.’

Queen Victoria – or Alexandrina Victoria – was born in London on May 24, 1819; her husband was born in Germany on August 26 that year.

The first tranche of papers from Prince Albert's collection is being published this summer to mark the bicentenary of the couple’s birth. But, because they are pasted in volumes, rather than individual letters, they are difficult to display to the public. Pictured: Victoria in 1854

The first tranche of papers from Prince Albert’s collection is being published this summer to mark the bicentenary of the couple’s birth. But, because they are pasted in volumes, rather than individual letters, they are difficult to display to the public. Pictured: Victoria in 1854

They were married on February 10, 1940 (above) and had nine children before Albert died in 1861

They were married on February 10, 1940 (above) and had nine children before Albert died in 1861

They were married on February 10, 1940 and had nine children before Albert died in 1861.

The three-day Great Exhibition Road Festival – which was inspired by the 1851 Great Exhibition – one of the defining moments of Queen Victoria’s reign and the brainchild of Prince Albert – opens on Friday with more than 150 live events.

Free tickets are available at greatexhibitionroadfestival.com 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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