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Man hacks into Ring surveillance camera to speak to young girl after she is left alone watching TV

A dad has shared creepy video footage of the moment a Ring home surveillance camera is hacked by an unknown man who speaks to his young daughter while he was out of the room.

Adam Krcilek and his daughter were inside their home on Wednesday morning when the scary incident took place in Sarpy County, Nebraska.  

Unknown to the family, the hacker was watching them on their Amazon Ring surveillance camera, which was sitting on the family’s kitchen counter. 

At one point, Krcilek goes to start his car outside and leaves his daughter to watch TV in the living room. 

A unknown man hacked into Adam Krcilek’s Amazon Ring surveillance camera on Wednesday morning

That’s when hacker decides to make his presence known to the young girl. 

‘What are you watching?, he asks, before continuing to bother the child. 

‘Hey, What show is that? I’ve seen that show before. What season are you on? Hello?’

The daughter either doesn’t hear the Amazon Ring hacker or chooses not to respond to the random voice. 

Krcilek reenters the kitchen and goes to the fridge while seemingly unaware of the hacker. 

When Krcilek (pictured) leaves the living room, the hacker begins speaking to his daughter and asks, 'What are you watching?'

When Krcilek (pictured) leaves the living room, the hacker begins speaking to his daughter and asks, ‘What are you watching?’ 

The hacker verbally taunts Krcilek before he walks over to the Ring system and unplugs the device

The hacker verbally taunts Krcilek before he walks over to the Ring system and unplugs the device 

‘What’re you eating?’ that hacker asks, causing Krcilek to look around briefly while the man quietly laughs. 

Krcilek appears to approach his daughter when the hacker speaks out again, asking ‘are you hungry?’

The father suddenly jerks around and looks surprised at the Ring as he quickly fits the pieces together. 

‘Who is this?’ Krcilek asked as he approached the surveillance camera. 

Krcilek told Storyful that he disabled the camera after the creepy episode and contacted Ring with his complaint. 

They told him that a third, unidentified phone had logged into their Ring account, but they were unable to trace it back to a source, 1011 Now reported. 

The company also told him to set up a two-factor verification for his system, but Krcilek claims they never advised him to do so when he bought the device six months ago. 

 Krcilek says he has removed all his Ring surveillance cameras from his home and spoke to the company following the incident 

‘That’s what I am so upset about now. I have now taken down all my interior Ring cameras,’ he said. 

In response, Ring said its systems and network were not compromised during the incident. 

They said: ‘Unfortunately, when people reuse the same username and password on multiple services, it’s possible for bad actors to gain access to many accounts.’

‘We will continue to introduce additional security features to keep your Ring account and devices secure.’

At least five families have reported hackers syncing into their devices and terrorizing their families.

Many of the families say the hackers used racial slurs to harass families in their homes.   

On Tuesday, news broke that a unknown man hacked into a Ring security camera inside an 8-year-old’s room and began talking to her. 

Mother Ashley LeMay recently released the chilling video of a hacker talking to her daughter through a Ring security camera. The footage was recorded at their family home in Desoto County, Mississippi.

LeMay had installed the camera in order to watch over her three daughters and to feel connected to them during her night shifts as a nurse.

She said that she had done extensive research before buying the product during the Black Friday sale and that it had also been recommended to her by another mother

But her daughter Alyssa said that she began hearing strange sounds in her bedroom including voices and music shortly after it was installed.

The footage released yesterday shows what happened after Alyssa went to investigate the noises as the haunting tune Tiptoe Through the Tulips began to play.

A mother has released a chilling video of a hacker talking to her eight-year-old daughter through a Ring security camera in her bedroom that was installed at the family home in Desoto County, Mississippi

A mother has released a chilling video of a hacker talking to her eight-year-old daughter through a Ring security camera in her bedroom that was installed at the family home in Desoto County, Mississippi

In the clip, she can be seen momentarily standing still in the middle of her room.

She shouts out ‘who is that?’ as someone can be heard breathing as if behind the camera.

Then a male voice replies and says: ‘I’m your best friend, I’m Santa Claus.’ There is a brief pause before Alyssa calls down in distress to her mother.

The man repeats himself once more by saying ‘I’m Santa Claus. Don’t you wanna be my best friend?’ and the video ends shortly after that.

Alyssa’s parents re-watched the tape later that evening and Ashley’s partner immediately disconnected the camera.

In the clip, the young girl can be seen momentarily standing still in the middle of her room before she shouts out 'who is that?'

In the clip, the young girl can be seen momentarily standing still in the middle of her room before she shouts out ‘who is that?’

A male voice then replies and says: 'I'm your best friend, I'm Santa Claus.' There is a brief pause before Alyssa shouts down in distress to her mother

A male voice then replies and says: ‘I’m your best friend, I’m Santa Claus.’ There is a brief pause before Alyssa shouts down in distress to her mother

Speaking to WMC, Ashley said: ‘They could have watched them sleeping, changing. I mean they could have seen all kinds of things.

‘Honestly, my gut makes me feel like it’s either somebody who knows us or somebody who is very close by.’

The family, who had only had the security camera for four days, have released the footage in order to issue a warning to other parents.

They have also now increased other security measures in the house including changing their WiFi settings so it is no longer visible to others.

Eight-year-old Alyssa (pictured) said that she began hearing strange sounds in her bedroom including voices and music shortly after the Ring doorbell was installed

Eight-year-old Alyssa (pictured) said that she began hearing strange sounds in her bedroom including voices and music shortly after the Ring doorbell was installed

A spokeswoman for Ring said: ‘Customer trust is important to us and we take the security of our devices seriously.

‘While we are still investigating this issue and are taking appropriate steps to protect our devices based on our investigation, we are able to confirm this incident is in no way related to a breach or compromise of Ring’s security.

‘Due to the fact that customers often use the same username and password for their various accounts and subscriptions, bad actors often re-use credentials stolen or leaked from one service on other services.

Ashley LeMay (pictured) had installed the Ring security camera in order to watch over her three daughters

Ashley LeMay (pictured) had installed the Ring security camera in order to watch over her three daughters

‘As a precaution, we highly and openly encourage all Ring users to enable two-factor authentication on their Ring account, add Shared Users (instead of sharing login credentials), use strong passwords, and regularly change their passwords.’

Desoto County investigators and Ring are now both looking into the identity of the interceptor.

There have been increasing reports in recent months of other cameras also being compromised.

In October, Jack Newcombe, a father from San Jose, California, spoke about how his Google Nest camera was hacked while he and his wife were at work.

Their 18-month-old son was at home at the time, being cared for by a nanny, when a woman’s voice spoke through the device.

She originally stated that the family had a nice house but became increasingly agitated before saying: ‘I’m coming for the baby if you don’t answer me, bi**h!’

The revelations come after it emerged that the locations of thousands of homeowners with Ring devices can be established using supposedly hidden data held by the doorbell company.

Updates on users’ GPS positions can actually be mined and plotted on sprawling maps, according to Gizmodo.

Dan Calacci, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Media Lab was able to plot the locations of up to 20,000 of Ring cameras across 15 cities in the US

Dan Calacci, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Media Lab was able to plot the locations of up to 20,000 of Ring cameras across 15 cities in the US

Residents with Ring can submit video footage of thieves caught on their doorbell cameras to the authorities via the Neighbors app. Their locations were able to be discovered

Residents with Ring can submit video footage of thieves caught on their doorbell cameras to the authorities via the Neighbors app. Their locations were able to be discovered 

It was possible to establish data on 65,800 people’s individual posts using the crime-alert app, Neighbors – a platform that allows users to post and comment on crime and security information in their area – even using posts that dated back more than 500 days.

PhD student Dan Calacci, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Media Lab, was able to compile a map showing every Ring video posted to the app since 2017.

The free Neighbors app from the smart doorbell company was bought last year by Amazon for a reported $1billion.

Gizmodo said that they had acquired the data over the past month to reveal the extent of the potential for video surveillance across America.

They were able to pinpoint the location to around a square inch of ground and follow coordinates to stand in front of the Ring doorbell at around four to six feet away.

The website claimed it only stopped mining the data when it had enough to demonstrate the ease of access and not because they were stopped by Ring.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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