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Manafort address court for the first time today to complain that his life had become a ‘shambles’

‘To say I’ve been humiliated and shunned is a gross understatement’: Manafort addressed the court for the first time at his sentencing to complain his life has become a ‘shambles’ – but failed to apologize for his crimes

  • Manafort, who will turn 70 next month, was wheeled into court in a wheelchair
  • He wore a prison-issue boiler suit with ‘Alexandria Inmate’ stamped across it
  • The longtime GOP operative chose not to speak in his own defense at trial
  •  But he took the opportunity to deliver a brief pre-sentence statement
  • Said the last two years of his life have been the most difficult he’s experienced 
  • He also complained that his mental health had deteriorated while behind bars 

Disgraced former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort addressed the court for the first time on Thursday to complain that his life had become a ‘shambles’ – but failed to apologize for his crimes.

Manafort, who will turn 70 next month inside Cumberland Federal Correctional Institution in Allegany, Maryland, was pushed into the courtroom in a wheelchair because of an undisclosed ailment.

He wore a green prison-issue boiler suit with words ‘Alexandria Inmate’ stamped across it – a far cry from the sharp suits and neckties he sported during his trial before Judge Ellis said he should dress like any other convicted felon.

The longtime GOP operative chose not to speak in his own defense during the trial phase but took the opportunity to deliver a brief pre-sentence statement.

Disgraced former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort addressed the court for the first time on Thursday to complain that his life had become a ‘shambles’ – but failed to apologize for his crimes

Manafort was given leave to remain in his seat because of his supposed poor health but Judge Ellis interrupted him immediately because the court couldn’t out make what he was saying.

‘The last two years of my life have been the most difficult that my family and I has ever experienced,’ Manafort repeated in a low voice, betraying barely a flicker of emotion and staring down at his notes.

‘The person that the media has described me as is not someone I recognize. To say I’ve been humiliated and shunned is a gross understatement.’

Manafort told the court he hoped in time to ‘show the world who I know I really am.’

He also complained that his mental health had deteriorated after being held in solitary at the Alexandria Detention Center ever since his bail was cancelled for alleged witness tampering.

The closest he came to taking responsibility for the eight tax and bank fraud charges he was convicted off last August was when the father-of-two said: ‘I know it is my conduct that has brought me here.’

Manafort, who will turn 70 next month inside Cumberland Federal Correctional Institution in Allegany, Maryland, was pushed into the courtroom in a wheelchair because of an undisclosed ailment

Manafort, who will turn 70 next month inside Cumberland Federal Correctional Institution in Allegany, Maryland, was pushed into the courtroom in a wheelchair because of an undisclosed ailment

But he went on to complain: ‘I can tell you I feel the punishment from these procedures already. My life professionally and financially is a shambles.

‘Being in solitary confinement I’ve had much time to reflect on my life and choices.’

Manafort ended by thanking the court for a fair trial. Addressing the judge directly, he added: ‘I am ready for your decision and I ask for your compassion.’

In his own sentencing remarks, Ellis admonished Manafort for failing to say sorry to the US taxpayers and the banks he defrauded.

‘I was surprised I did not hear you express regret for engaging in wrongful conduct,’ he said. ‘In other words you did not say that I really, really regret not doing what the law requires.’

Judge Ellis ordered that restitution should be no less $6 million and no more than $25 million. He also hit Manafort with a $50,000 fine.

Manafort ended by thanking the court for a fair trial. Addressing the judge directly, he added: 'I am ready for your decision and I ask for your compassion'. He is pictured with Trump at the Republican National Convention in 2016

Manafort ended by thanking the court for a fair trial. Addressing the judge directly, he added: ‘I am ready for your decision and I ask for your compassion’. He is pictured with Trump at the Republican National Convention in 2016 

Manafort remained seated until the very last moment when he slowly rose to his feet as Judge Ellis left the courthouse, using a wooden cane to balance himself.

He turned and flashed a brief smile at his 66-year-old wife Kathleen, who had sat silently a few feet behind him in the public gallery as she had throughout his three week trial late last summer.

With that Manafort sank back in his wheelchair and a court guard quickly wheeled him out of the room.

His lawyers have claimed in filings that Manafort suffered from gout and depression.

He appeared at a previous court hearing in a wheelchair because of an undisclosed ailment causing his leg to swell.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk