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Marcus Ericsson survives spectacular crash during practice at Monza

Marcus Ericsson survived one of the most spectacular crashes in modern Formula One when his car hit the wall at 220mph during Friday’s practice for the Italian Grand Prix.

The 27-year-old Swede was hurtling towards the first corner at Monza – the Temple of Speed – when he lost control of his Sauber.

The car veered left into the Heineken-clad wall and somersaulted three times through the air before landing the right way up on the side of the track. The entire front of the car lay in bits on the tarmac.

 

Marcus Ericsson survived one of the most spectacular crashes in modern Formula One during Italian Grand Prix practice

His car hit the wall at 220mph at Monza before somersaulting three times through the air before landing the right way up

His car hit the wall at 220mph at Monza before somersaulting three times through the air before landing the right way up

The 27-year-old Swede was hurtling towards the first corner at Monza – the Temple of Speed – when he lost control

The 27-year-old Swede was hurtling towards the first corner at Monza – the Temple of Speed – when he lost control

Ericsson's car turned 180 degrees upside down as it continued to roll off the track during the terrifying incident

Ericsson’s car turned 180 degrees upside down as it continued to roll off the track during the terrifying incident

Stunning images show the car hurtling through the area at 220mph during Friday's second practice session

Stunning images show the car hurtling through the area at 220mph during Friday’s second practice session

Ericsson’s crash on Friday followed his team-mate Charles Leclerc’s miracle escape at Spa last weekend

Ericsson’s crash on Friday followed his team-mate Charles Leclerc’s miracle escape at Spa last weekend

The halo safety device kept out Fernando Alonso’s flying McLaren last week and proved vital again for Ericsson

The halo safety device kept out Fernando Alonso’s flying McLaren last week and proved vital again for Ericsson

The car suffered exponential damage but fortunately Ericsson managed to walk away largely unscathed

The car suffered exponential damage but fortunately Ericsson managed to walk away largely unscathed

WHAT IS THE ‘HALO’?

The ‘halo’ was introduced at the start of the new Formula One season and it was designed to protect the drivers’ heads from flying debris.

It consists of a carbon fibre ring around the driver’s helmet, with a thin central pillar down the front, for both protection and support.  

The halo is mandatory, so all 20 cars sport it. Opinions on it vary – some feel it ruins the look of the cars, others say it is barely noticeable. Most, however, agree that it is necessary, in order to provide more protection to drivers.

Ericsson was helped out of the car and taken to the medical centre. He walked in through the gates for a check-up as marshals in orange overalls swarmed over the scene of the crash, clearing up the mess as second practice was brought to a halt by the red flag. 

‘I don’t know what happened,’ said Ericsson. ‘I am OK.’ He was limping as he returned to the garage and rubbing his neck.

Ericsson’s crash followed his team-mate Charles Leclerc’s miracle escape at Spa last weekend, when the halo safety device kept out Fernando Alonso’s flying McLaren. 

Alonso flew through the air and landed on Leclerc’s car during the first lap of Sunday’s Belgian Grand Prix. Footage showed Alonso’s front right wheel buckling on the titanium halo, which absorbed the full force of the hit and broke the McLaren’s suspension, rather than hitting Leclerc directly on the head as it would have done without the cockpit protection.

The device was introduced at the start of this season drivers’ championship despite opposition from traditionalists, who thought the three-pronged contraption an ugly addition that compromised the purity of open cockpit racing.

Even Leclerc, a 20-year-old Monegasque, was no fan. However, after walking away from the accident, he said: ‘I did not want the halo originally, but I have to say I am pleased it was over my head on Sunday.’

Marshals in orange overalls swarmed over the scene of the crash to clean the debris up and take the vehicle away

Marshals in orange overalls swarmed over the scene of the crash to clean the debris up and take the vehicle away

The second practice was brought to a halt by the red flag after the incident in Italy and heavy damage was clearly visible

The second practice was brought to a halt by the red flag after the incident in Italy and heavy damage was clearly visible

The Sauber car is recovered back to the pits on the back of a truck after Ericsson crashed in the second practice session

Ericsson, pictured after the crash, was helped out of the car and taken to the medical centre and looked shaken

Ericsson, pictured after the crash, was helped out of the car and taken to the medical centre and looked shaken

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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