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Mexican official slammed for selfie at Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral

Mexico’s foreign minister slammed back home for sharing selfie of him and his wife at Queen Elizabeth’s state funeral

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Mexico’s foreign minister is facing a wave of backlash after he shared a selfie of himself and his wife prior to Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral. Marcelo Ebrard posed alongside his wife, Rosalinda Bueso, as the couple smiled before he uploaded the picture to his Twitter account Monday. ‘At the State Funeral of HM (Her Majesty) Queen Elizabeth II,’ wrote Ebrard before he joined other world leaders at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor, England. 

His tweet was labeled as tasteless and a lack of respect towards the Queen, who died September 8 after 70 years as the head of the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms. 'I find it disrespectful to take selfies at a funeral,' one person tweeted.

His tweet was labeled as tasteless and a lack of respect towards the Queen, who died September 8 after 70 years as the head of the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms. ‘I find it disrespectful to take selfies at a funeral,’ one person tweeted. 

Another user on the platform lashed out at Ebrard for not showing decency. 'I find it disrespectful to take selfies at a funeral,' the person wrote. 'You're not at a birthday party to be taking selfies, Marcelo. Act accordingly. You are representing Mexico.'

Another user on the platform lashed out at Ebrard for not showing decency. ‘I find it disrespectful to take selfies at a funeral,’ the person wrote. ‘You’re not at a birthday party to be taking selfies, Marcelo. Act accordingly. You are representing Mexico.’ 

Another said: 'Selfies at a funeral... in bad taste, chancellor.'

Another said: ‘Selfies at a funeral… in bad taste, chancellor.’ 

One follower equated Ebrard's tweet to the behavior that some vacationers tend to display when visiting The Tower of London. 'Marcelo is the typical tourist who goes to bother the Beefeaters and the royal guards to see if they move,' the user wrote. 'He is the typical tourist who goes and wants to touch the Mona Lisa. He is the typical tourist who puts the name of Mexico in the sewer. Thank you, I am honored by your visit.'

One follower equated Ebrard’s tweet to the behavior that some vacationers tend to display when visiting The Tower of London. ‘Marcelo is the typical tourist who goes to bother the Beefeaters and the royal guards to see if they move,’ the user wrote. ‘He is the typical tourist who goes and wants to touch the Mona Lisa. He is the typical tourist who puts the name of Mexico in the sewer. Thank you, I am honored by your visit.’ 

The state funeral for Queen Elizabeth II is the first since Winston Churchill's was filled with spectacle. Ahead of the service, a bell tolled 96 times - once a minute for each year of Queen Elizabeth II's life. Then, 142 Royal Navy sailors used ropes to draw the gun carriage carrying her flag-draped coffin to Westminster Abbey before pallbearers bore it inside the church. The trappings of state and monarchy abounded: The coffin was draped with the Royal Standard and atop it sat the Imperial State Crown, sparkling with almost 3,000 diamonds, and the sovereign's orb and scepter.

The state funeral for Queen Elizabeth II is the first since Winston Churchill’s was filled with spectacle. Ahead of the service, a bell tolled 96 times – once a minute for each year of Queen Elizabeth II’s life. Then, 142 Royal Navy sailors used ropes to draw the gun carriage carrying her flag-draped coffin to Westminster Abbey before pallbearers bore it inside the church. The trappings of state and monarchy abounded: The coffin was draped with the Royal Standard and atop it sat the Imperial State Crown, sparkling with almost 3,000 diamonds, and the sovereign’s orb and scepter. 

There were also personal touches. The coffin was followed into the church by generations of Queen Elizabeth II's descendants, including King Charles III, heir to the throne Prince William and nine-year-old George, who is second in line. On a wreath atop the coffin, a handwritten note read, 'In loving and devoted memory,' and was signed Charles R - for Rex, or king. The service drew to a close with two minutes of silence observed across the United Kingdom, after which the attendees sang the national anthem, now titled 'God Save the King.' Pictured: Mexico's Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard (right) and his wife, Rosalinda Bueso (second to the right) attend a service for the late Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday

There were also personal touches. The coffin was followed into the church by generations of Queen Elizabeth II’s descendants, including King Charles III, heir to the throne Prince William and nine-year-old George, who is second in line. On a wreath atop the coffin, a handwritten note read, ‘In loving and devoted memory,’ and was signed Charles R – for Rex, or king. The service drew to a close with two minutes of silence observed across the United Kingdom, after which the attendees sang the national anthem, now titled ‘God Save the King.’ Pictured: Mexico’s Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard (right) and his wife, Rosalinda Bueso (second to the right) attend a service for the late Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday

The Queen is leaving London for the final time after a poignant last passing of Buckingham Palace as her coffin was carried from Westminster Abbey through London after her state funeral today followed by her mourning family. Her Majesty is on her longest and saddest journey and will be laid to rest in Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip and her parents at St George's Chapel later.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said in his sermon at the funeral that ‘few leaders receive the outpouring of love we have seen’ for Elizabeth. 

Her coffin was placed close to the altar with her crown, orb and scepter on its top surrounded by flowers chosen by the King from gardens she loved. A card in the flowers on top of the coffin read simply: 'In loving and devoted memory. Charles R.' The Archbishop of Canterbury hailed the Queen's 'abundant life and loving service' as he delivered the sermon at her state funeral, adding: 'She was joyful, present to so many, touching a multitude of lives.' State trumpeters from the Household Cavalry sounded the Last Post following the Archbishop of Canterbury's commendation over the Queen's coffin and a blessing pronounced by the Dean of Westminster. Two minute's silence followed across the country before Reveille was sounded by the trumpeters before the National Anthem was sung by the congregation.

Later, during the committal ceremony in St. George’s Chapel on the grounds of Windsor Castle, the Imperial State Crown and the sovereign’s orb and scepter were removed from the coffin and placed on the altar – separating the queen from her crown for the last time. Her coffin was then lowered into the royal vault through an opening in the chapel’s floor. She will later be laid to rest with her husband, Prince Philip, at a private family service. 

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