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Millionaire landed helicopter in national park is fined $800 for stunt 

Millionaire cattle baron who landed his helicopter in a national park so his terminally ill cousin could go fishing at a secret spot is fined $800 for stunt

  • Millionaire cattle baron fined $800 for flying his helicopter into a national park 
  • He was dropping off his cousin, who is terminally ill with cancer, to a fishing spot
  • Alan Norman Fisher pleaded guilty, fined $800, but walked free from the court

A millionaire cattle baron was fined $800 for flying his helicopter into a national park to grant his terminally ill cousin his dying wish of going fishing at a secret spot.

Alan Norman Fisher dropped off his cousin, who is terminally ill with cancer, on a remote floodplain in Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

On Friday the 44-year-old cattle baron pleaded guilty to the Commonwealth offence of landing an aircraft inside a declared Commonwealth reserve, NT News reported.  

A millionaire cattle baron was fined $800 for flying his helicopter into Kakadu National Park (pictured) to grant his terminally ill cousin his dying wish of going fishing in a secret spot

Mr Fisher copped an $800 fine for the deed, but walked away from court without a conviction. 

Lawyer Peter Maley said Mr Fisher was granting his cousin’s dying wish and didn’t have an alternative motive to the trip.

‘His cousin who is terminally ill with cancer wanted to catch a big fish,’ he said. 

Mr Maley said there was no commercial aspect of the trip and all fish that were caught were then released.  

‘He’s not running a fishing tour business,’ he said. 

Mr Fisher was caught after four men were seen fishing by rangers.

They were fishing 3.5 kilometres inside the park, in an area closed to visitors and not accessible by road or track.

Alan Norman Fisher dropped off his cousin, who is terminally ill with cancer, on a remote floodplain in Kakadu National Park (stock image)

Alan Norman Fisher dropped off his cousin, who is terminally ill with cancer, on a remote floodplain in Kakadu National Park (stock image)

Mr Fisher was repeatedly flying in and out of the park as he had to drop the fishermen off one at a time while flying his two-seater Robinson R22 helicopter. 

Owner of Wombungi, Swim Creek and Mary River East Stations, Mr Fisher owns seven helicopters, ran more than 30,000 head of cattle and employs 30 people.

With three children and a family extremely well known in rural Northern Territory, Mr Maley argued his client is a ‘son of the Territory’.

Four men were fishing 3.5 kilometres inside the park, an area closed to visitors and not accessible by road or track

Four men were fishing 3.5 kilometres inside the park, an area closed to visitors and not accessible by road or track

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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