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Mumsnet user asks how much to spend on a leaving present

Deciding how much to spend on a co-worker’s leaving present can be tricky – especially if you aren’t close or you haven’t known them for a long time.

A British 19-year-old supermarket worker asked users of Mumsnet for their views after revealing she had spent £72.34 on a colleague. 

Speaking under the handle ‘LilacBearberry’, she shared that the woman had racked up the sum after she offered to pay for a few items of shopping as a leaving present.

She wrote: ‘I told her to grab a few bits and I’ll treat her. The shopping came to £72.34, she then goes “thanks so much”.

‘Maybe it was my fault for doing what I did, but don’t you think that’s quite rude?’ 

A 19-year-old supermarket worker revealed she had spent £72.34 on a co-worker’s leaving present (file image)

Users of Mumsnet were asked if they thought it was rude that a co-worker racked up a large bill when offered to choose items in a supermarket as a leaving treat

Users of Mumsnet were asked if they thought it was rude that a co-worker racked up a large bill when offered to choose items in a supermarket as a leaving treat

The supermarket worker asked if it was rude for her colleague to rack up the arguably hefty bill knowing she’s a student. 

She also later revealed they hadn’t been close but she felt it was necessary to buy a gift as everyone else did. 

Most responses to the thread slammed her for agreeing to pay the amount and questioned why she didn’t give the woman a maximum spend.

One person wrote: ‘I’m sorry when the bill came to over £70, I don’t get why you didn’t say something, no one is that spineless.’

Another said: ‘I would’ve refused to pay for it. Sorry but think £10-£15 max would’ve been more reasonable. £70 odd quid? cheek’.

The teen received a wave of responses questioning why she agreed to pay for all the shopping

The teen received a wave of responses questioning why she agreed to pay for all the shopping

One person shared they had been in a similar situation where they felt compelled to give someone money.

Others gave advice on how to stop people taking advantage.

A user with the handle ‘Glumglowworm’ wrote: ‘That’s a ridiculous amount to have spent on someone’s generosity,  but you really need to learn to say no.

‘You should have simply said ‘oh I didn’t know today was your last day! I have a gift for you at home, when would be good to meet up so I can give it to you.

‘Work on saying no, it’ll do you good and stop CFs taking advantage of you’. 

Some people questioned why the teen felt a need to buy a gift at all and advised against doing it again

Some people questioned why the teen felt a need to buy a gift at all and advised against doing it again

Others debated over if it’s strange to offer to pay for someone’s shopping and suggested the teen could have bought wine and chocolate to give. 

One person said: ‘It was a bizarre offer. All you needed to do was buy a bottle of wine yourself if you really felt the need to buy a gift. But you hardly knew her so buying a gift anyway was unnecessary’.

Another speaking under the handle ‘Emmageddon’ wrote: ‘She must have realised you meant for her to get a bottle of wine and some chocs, not a full trolley of groceries’.

Others felt that the teen had been taken advantage of and suggested alternative solutions she could've chosen

Others felt that the teen had been taken advantage of and suggested alternative solutions she could’ve chosen



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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