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New drone footage shows Paradise completely wiped out by Camp Fire

Home after home completely leveled, cars all burned to a crisp, everything in site either gray rubble or black ash. 

This is the horrific portrait of devastation captured by new drone footage in Paradise, the Northern California town that was completely wiped out by the Camp Fire. 

The Camp Fire is now the deadliest and most destructive fire in the state’s history, killing at least 48 people and destroying more than 6,500 homes and 260 buildings as it burned through more than 160,000 acres.

After six days, the blaze only remains 35 percent contained and more than 200 people are still missing. 

The new drone footage, obtained by ABC10, shows all that is left in Paradise, which was consumed so quickly by the Camp Fire that many victims didn’t even have time to start their cars. Some bodies were found laying next to vehicles. 

New drone footage has revealed the extent of devastation in the town of Paradise, which was completely wiped out by a California wildfire 

The devastating footage shows home after home completely leveled, cars all burned to a crisp, everything in site either gray rubble or black ash

The devastating footage shows home after home completely leveled, cars all burned to a crisp, everything in site either gray rubble or black ash

Plot after plot of land, where houses in the popular retirement community of 27,000 once proudly stood, are now completely empty. 

What was once bedrooms, kitchens, and backyards are now entirely indistinguishable, all reduced to similar looking pieces of rubble. 

In one plot, all that eerily stands is a slew of porch steps leading up to a home that no longer exists.  

On the opposite end of California, there were similar scenes of devastation as a Los Angeles sheriff shared aerial images of the Woolsey Fire’s destruction. 

The heartbreaking photos, shared by Sheriff Jim McDonnell, show rows and rows of home reduced to rubble, the trees and vegetation surrounding them singed to nothingness.  

‘While touring #WoolseyFire burn areas & seeing the devastation from above it brings a greater understanding that each house is a home,’ McDonnell tweeted alongside the photos on Tuesday. ‘Each home has a life & memories attached to it.’  

Paradise was consumed so quickly by the Camp Fire that many victims didn't even have time to start their cars and escape 

Paradise was consumed so quickly by the Camp Fire that many victims didn’t even have time to start their cars and escape 

The death toll for the Camp Fire rose to 48 on Tuesday night and more than 200 people remain missing, authorities said 

The death toll for the Camp Fire rose to 48 on Tuesday night and more than 200 people remain missing, authorities said 

Plot after plot of land, where houses in the popular retirement community of 27,000 once proudly stood, are now empty

Plot after plot of land, where houses in the popular retirement community of 27,000 once proudly stood, are now empty

Aerial images have also been released that show the destruction of several celebrities’ homes, including the Malibu mansions of Robin Thicke and Liam Hemsworth and Miley Cyrus. 

CA WILDFIRES BY THE NUMBERS

Camp Fire

48 people killed, 200 missing 

130,000 acres burned, 35% contained

8,817 structures destroyed, including 7,600 homes 

Woolsey Fire 

2 people killed  

97,620 acres burned, 47% contained 

435 structures destroyed, 57,000 still under threat 

Hill Fire 

4,531 acres burned, 94 percent contained

The Woolsey Fire has killed two people and tore through more than 97,620 acres, burning an area the size of Denver and destroying more than 400 structures and 80 percent of National Parks Service land in the Santa Monica Mountains.

As of Wednesday morning it was 47 percent contained.

In Paradise, authorities are currently working hard to identify more victims of the horrific blaze.   

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said the devastation is so complete in some neighborhoods that ‘it’s very difficult to determine whether or not there may be human remains there’.

‘In some cases, the only remains we are able to recover are bones or bone fragments,’ Honea said, adding that these were so small that coroner’s investigators were using a wire basket to sift and sort them.

Honea said his office had received more than 1,500 requests for ‘welfare checks’ from people concerned about the fate of their loved ones.

Authorities have set up a rapid DNA analysis system and brought in cadaver dogs and mobile morgue units from the military in an intensified effort to find and identify victims. They have also requested 150 additional search-and-rescue personnel.

Chaplains accompanied some coroner search teams that visited dozens of addresses belonging to people reported missing.

On the opposite end of California, there were similar scenes of devastation as a Los Angeles sheriff shared aerial images of the Woolsey Fire's destruction (pictured) 

On the opposite end of California, there were similar scenes of devastation as a Los Angeles sheriff shared aerial images of the Woolsey Fire’s destruction (pictured) 

The heartbreaking photos, shared by Sheriff Jim McDonnell, show rows and rows of home reduced to rubble, the trees and vegetation surrounding them singed to nothingness

The heartbreaking photos, shared by Sheriff Jim McDonnell, show rows and rows of home reduced to rubble, the trees and vegetation surrounding them singed to nothingness

The Woolsey Fire has killed two people and tore through more than 97,620 acres, burning an area the size of Denver and destroying more than 400 structures and 80 percent of National Parks Service land

The Woolsey Fire has killed two people and tore through more than 97,620 acres, burning an area the size of Denver and destroying more than 400 structures and 80 percent of National Parks Service land

The Camp Fire, Woolsey Fire, and Hill Fire are all still blazing across California as of Wednesday morning, as the map shows 

The Camp Fire, Woolsey Fire, and Hill Fire are all still blazing across California as of Wednesday morning, as the map shows 

Ernest Foss, 63, Jesus ‘Zeus’ Fernandez, 48, Carl Wiley, 77, Ellen Walker, Lolene Rios, 58, and Debbe Morningstar, 65, are the first six Camp Fire victims to be publicly identified. 

Foss was a rock and roll musician who raised three children as a single father in San Francisco, where he built a recording studio in their small Bay Area home and taught music lessons. 

He moved to Paradise eight years ago to escape the rising costs of San Francisco. 

Angela Loo, Foss’ daughter, said he was bedridden and had been living with advanced lymphedema for 10 years, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. 

His body was found next to his beloved service dog Bernice outside his home, which he shared with a stepson and caretaker, near his minivan. 

Aerial images have also been released that show the destruction of several celebrities' homes, including Liam Hemsworth and Miley Cyrus' Malibu mansion (pictured) 

Aerial images have also been released that show the destruction of several celebrities’ homes, including Liam Hemsworth and Miley Cyrus’ Malibu mansion (pictured) 

Aerial images also showed that the fire had completely wiped out the home Robin Thicke shared with April Love Geary 

Aerial images also showed that the fire had completely wiped out the home Robin Thicke shared with April Love Geary 

Loo believes his stepbrother may have been able to get him into a wheelchair and near the car. Foss’ caretaker, Andrew Burt, remains missing. 

Rios and her husband Rick, 69, had both relocated in Paradise after losing their home to another fire in Concow in the 1990s.

The retired couple, like many in the town, only found out about the blaze when it was too late.

Rick saw their neighbor’s house up in flames and went on the roof, hoping he could still save their house by taking out any spot fires.

Rios went to the basement as she began gathering the family’s dogs. In moments, their house was ablaze.

Rick was rescued by firefighters who pulled him off the roof. He is now recovering in the hospital with severe burns on his hands and face, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

‘My dad is in a lot of pain,’ Maria Rios said. ‘He keeps saying, “I have no skin, no skin”. As soon as he heard my voice, he broke down. He kept saying, “Everything is gone. Everything is gone.”’  

Carl Wiley will be buried next to his wife in a cemetery in Magalia, which was also devastated by the Camp Fire.

Ernest Foss, 63, has been identified as one of the victims of California's Camp Fire

Jesus 'Zeus' Fernandez, 48, also perished in the flames

Ernest Foss, 63, of Paradise (left), and Jesus ‘Zeus’ Fernandez, 48, of Concow (right), both died in the Camp Fire in California

Family members of Lolene Rios, 58, (right) have also identified her as another victim in Paradise. Her husband Rick Rios, 69, (left) barely made it out of their home alive 

Family members of Lolene Rios, 58, (right) have also identified her as another victim in Paradise. Her husband Rick Rios, 69, (left) barely made it out of their home alive 

James Wiley said his father, a former tire recapper for Michelin, will share a headstone with his wife Mary Lee, who died of cancer nearly three decades ago.

Fernandez, who also lived in Paradise, was remembered as the ‘epitome of determination, respect, loyalty, and perseverance’. 

‘A tireless provider, a dependable and loyal friend, a considerate neighbor, and loving father, he will be sorely missed by all who knew him,’ said family friend Myrna Pascua. 

Morningstar was retired and lived in Paradise for more than 30 years. While she had evacuated her home during previous fires, she decided not to leave on Thursday. 

Several victims of the Camp Fire filed lawsuits against Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) in San Francisco County Superior Court on Tuesday. 

The suit accuses PG&E of being responsible for the destructive blaze, claiming it failed to properly maintain its equipment and infrastructure. 

PG&E informed the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) that a high-voltage power line experienced a problem near the origin of the Camp Fire just minutes before the blaze broke out. 

A volunteer search and rescue crew from Calaveras County comb through a home destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise on Tuesday afternoon 

A volunteer search and rescue crew from Calaveras County comb through a home destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise on Tuesday afternoon 

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea revealed that the remains of 13 additional people were located on Monday. Honea said 10 human remains were located in Paradise. Seven of those were found in homes and three outside

Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea revealed that the remains of 13 additional people were located on Monday. Honea said 10 human remains were located in Paradise. Seven of those were found in homes and three outside

This map shows the location of the Camp, Hill and Woolsey fires in California. In total, 44 people have died in the blazes

The Camp fire originated on Camp Creek Road near Highway 70 around 6.30am on Thursday.

Betsy Ann Cowley lives on 64 acres in Pulga, right next to the junction with Camp Creek Road. Cowly revealed that PG&E emailed her the day before the fire began and said it needed to investigate power lines on her land.

The email said the company was sending employees to work on the high-power lines because ‘they were having problems with sparks’.   

And, two days before the fire started, PG&E told customers in nine counties, including Butte County, that it might shut off their power November 8 because of extreme fire danger.

But the utility company called off the shutdown, telling customers nine hours after the Camp Fire began that the weather conditions ‘did not warrant this safety measure’.

Mike Danko, a lawyer representing the Camp Fire victims, claims that the company did not go through with the planned shutdown on November 8 because company bonuses are tied to customer complaints.

‘This is the worst of them all, because PG&E knew what to do to prevent the fire, knew what the risks of a fire are, and instead lined their pockets at the expense of customer safety,’ he said.

Honea said his team is working to identify the remains and notify the next of kin as soon as possible.Forensic investigators search a community swimming pool for victims of the Camp Fire in Paradise on Tuesday 

Honea said his team is working to identify the remains and notify the next of kin as soon as possible.Forensic investigators search a community swimming pool for victims of the Camp Fire in Paradise on Tuesday 

Danko said he expects more lawsuits against PG&E will be filed soon. 

‘They’ve destroyed people’s lives, killed people and burned down many houses – in fact, an entire town,’ he told the San Francisco Chronicle. ‘At some point, there has to be accountability.’   

The cause of the fire remains under investigation but CalFire spokesman Scott McLean said ‘electric equipment’ was being included in the probe.

US Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will visit Paradise on Wednesday after canceling a planned trip to Asia at the direction of the White House. He then plans to visit a community devastated by the Woolsey Fire. 

Zinke’s visit comes nearly a week after President Donald Trump drew widespread criticism after he blamed the deadly fires on ‘poor forest management’ and even threatened to withhold federal funds. 

Trump has since approved a major disaster declaration for the state, hastening the availability of federal emergency assistance to fire-stricken regions.

The major-disaster declaration will also make victims eligible for crisis counseling, housing and unemployment help, and legal aid. 

Although California’s wildfires have been burning for nearly a week, high winds and low humidity are continuing to fuel the flames.

The Woolsey Fire ripped through 50 acres in the Santa Monica Mountains on Tuesday afternoon as hurricane-force winds of 85mph sparked a new flare-up. 

Authorities believe the new flare-up (pictured) was caused by what are known as 'red flag conditions', in which low humidity and high winds combine to make the perfect conditions for a wildland fire combustion 

Authorities believe the new flare-up (pictured) was caused by what are known as ‘red flag conditions’, in which low humidity and high winds combine to make the perfect conditions for a wildland fire combustion 

The blaze (seen on Tuesday) has prompted new evacuations at the same time thousands of residents are finally being allowed back into their neighborhoods after the Woolsey Fire first ignited on Tuesday 

The blaze (seen on Tuesday) has prompted new evacuations at the same time thousands of residents are finally being allowed back into their neighborhoods after the Woolsey Fire first ignited on Tuesday 

The Woolsey fire continued to burn largely out of control in southern California on Tuesday night after hurricane-strength winds fanned flames in the Santa Monica Mountains, causing a flare-up which burned 50 acres in 30 minutes (pictured left)

The Woolsey fire continued to burn largely out of control in southern California on Tuesday night after hurricane-strength winds fanned flames in the Santa Monica Mountains, causing a flare-up which burned 50 acres in 30 minutes (pictured left)

Authorities believe the flare-up was caused by what are known as ‘red flag conditions’, in which low humidity and high winds combine to make the perfect conditions for a wildland fire combustion.

‘It’s critically dry with incredibly strong winds, so that really puts us back into a day where we could see rapid fire spread as a result of any new fires or flare-ups,’ Cal Fire Division Chief Chris Anthony told the Los Angeles Times.

‘We are not out of the woods yet,’ added Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen. ‘We still have incredibly tough conditions ahead of us.’ 

Another flare-up also broke out in Rialto around 9pm on Tuesday night, burning 20 acres in just minutes and tearing through 147 acres by Wednesday morning, according to KABC. 

Fire crews had to fight against 50mph winds as a number of power lines, as well as some backyards and one palm tree, caught on fire. 

But strong wind gusts thankfully sent most of the flames away from the homes and no structures caught on fire.   

Fire officials were able to lift evacuation orders early Tuesday in all or parts of about five communities in Ventura and Los Angeles counties – including the star-studded Hidden Hills, Calabasas, and Malibu.

The Kardashian clan, Simon Cowell, Will Smith, and Lady Gaga were just a few of the dozens of celebrities who had to evacuate.

And Gerard Butler, Neil Young, and Camille Grammer Meyer were among those who lost their homes in the blaze. 

Large areas of Los Angeles still remain off-limits due to downed power lines, embers that could re-ignite, buckled roads, and lack of power and communications.

But there was some good news for Southern California as the Hill Fire, which has also been burning through the weekend, reached 94 percent containment on Wednesday after scorching 4,531 acres in Ventura County. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk