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Not all headaches feel the same, handy picture guide shows

  • Sinus headaches typically cause pain in the cheeks, eyebrows and forehead
  • Tension headaches often target the back of the neck and shoulders
  • Migraines usually lead to a throbbing pain sensation in both sides of the head
  • They typically occur in four stages, and cause light sensitivity and nausea
  • Migraines affect one in seven people; 190,000 attacks occur a day in the UK

Not all headaches hurt in the same way. 

Sinus headaches typically cause pain in the cheeks, eyebrows and forehead, a handy picture guide shows.

Tension headaches tend to target the back of the neck, as well as causing shoulder tenderness.

As well as light sensitivity, nausea and vision loss, migraines often lead to a throbbing sensation in both sides of the head.

Migraines affect around one in seven people, with more than 190,000 attacks taking place every day in the UK.

Scroll down to see what type of headache you may be suffering from.

Not all headaches hurt in the same way: Handy picture guide explains the different pain (stock)

Sinus headaches often cause pain, pressure and a feeling of 'fullness' in the forehead

Sinus headaches often cause pain, pressure and a feeling of ‘fullness’ in the forehead

Sinus headaches 

Sinus headaches often cause pain, as well as pressure and a feeling of ‘fullness’ in the cheeks, eyebrows and forehead, according Business Insider Australia.

These symptoms tend to be worse when the person lies down or leans forward.

Other symptoms include fatigue and a stuffy nose.

Tension headaches can cause a dull pain and pressures on the sides or back of the head 

Tension headaches can cause a dull pain and pressures on the sides or back of the head 

Tension headaches 

Tension headaches can last anywhere between half an hour and one week.

The pain is dull, along with pressure on the sides or back of the head.

People’s scalp, neck and shoulders may also feel tender.

Migraines, which typically have four stages, can lead to headaches that last up to 72 hours

Migraines, which typically have four stages, can lead to headaches that last up to 72 hours

Migraines 

WHAT HELPS TO PREVENT MIGRAINES?

Being open to new experiences reduces people’s risk of migraines, research suggested in June 2017.

A preference for variation over routine prevents crippling headaches among depression sufferers, a study found.

Yet, neuroticism – a personality trait associated with nervousness and irritability – increases migraine’s risk, the research adds.

Study author Dr Máté Magyar from Semmelweis University in Budapest, said: ‘An open character appears to offer protection from [migraine].

‘Our study results could help to provide a better understanding of the biopsychosocial background of migraine, and help to find novel strategies in the prevention of and interventions for [migraine].’ 

The researchers analysed the relationship between personality traits, depression and migraines in more than 3,000 sufferers of the mental-health condition.

Depression is associated with an increased risk of migraines.

The participants were ranked according to their openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism. 

Migraines, which typically have four stages, usually start with mood changes, food cravings or neck stiffness. This ‘prodome’ stage may occur up to two days before the attack.

Aura happens before or during a migraine, and leads to bright spots or flashes, vision loss and jerky movements.

The actual migraine attacks usually lasts between four and 72 hours. It is defined a throbbing pain, often on both sides of the head. People may also experience light sensitivity and nausea. 

‘Post-drome’ occurs up to a day after a migraine. During this stage, people may be confused, moody or dizzy. 

Hair transplants may cure migraines 

This comes after research released last January suggested hair transplants cure migraines.

The cosmetic procedure prevents headaches in people who have suffered crippling pain for up to 20 years, a study by the SO-EP Aesthetic & Plastic Surgery Clinic, Turkey, found.

After undergoing hair transplants, migraine sufferers who experienced agonising discomfort for up to four hours, several times a month, no longer require any pain-relieving medication, the research adds.

It is unclear how hair transplants prevent migraines, however, it may be linked to the surgery destroying nerve endings in the scalp, reducing signals that trigger such pain.

Everton striker and former England footballer Wayne Rooney underwent a hair transplant at just 25 years old in 2011 after he started to go bald.

The father-of-three, who is married to Coleen Rooney, is thought to have spent around £30,000 on subsequent procedures at London’s Harley Street Hair Clinic 

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