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NRL match-fixing investigation cocaine prostitutes gamble

A match-fixing investigation has revealed organised crime figures are offering NRL players cocaine and prostitutes in a bid for inside information.

A New South Wales police probe into NRL match fixing allegations, linked two of the most notorious crime figures in Sydney to first grade rugby league players.

The police probe found Sydney-based crime king pins traded drugs, sex workers and encouraged players to gamble in the hope they would spill pre-game information. 

A New South Wales police probe into NRL match fixing allegations, linked two of the most notorious crime figures in Sydney to first grade rugby league players

Despite extensive investigations, the NSW police probe found no evidence of match fixing, The Daily Telegraph reported. 

The police investigated reports of match fixing relating to three games in 2015 and one in 2016. 

A special police unit called Strike Force Nuralda was created to investigate the accusations. 

While no match-fixing was uncovered, police found a number of irregular bets including a $100,000 bet by a major gambling identity. 

The police also uncovered more regular ‘suspicious betting behaviour’ including abnormally high bets of $10,000 from punters who usually only bet $50. 

The police probe found Sydney-based crime king pins traded drugs and sex workers and encouraged players to gamble in the hope they would spill pre-game information (stock) 

The police probe found Sydney-based crime king pins traded drugs and sex workers and encouraged players to gamble in the hope they would spill pre-game information (stock) 

Strike Force Nuralda interviewed more than 160 people including players, referees, club officials and professional punters. They also trawled through phone data and bank accounts.

The strike force was set up to look into four matches at the request of the NRL and betting agencies.

The four matches at the centre of investigations included Manly games against South Sydney and Parramatta in 2016. 

The Manly Sea Eagles vehemently denied any wrongdoing. 

The four matches at the centre of investigations included Manly's games against South Sydney in June 2015, and Parramatta in August the same year (Manly fans pictured) 

The four matches at the centre of investigations included Manly’s games against South Sydney in June 2015, and Parramatta in August the same year (Manly fans pictured) 

There were 13 persons of interest in Australian NRL at the centre of police investigations. 

‘While investigators were provided information and noted suspicious betting behaviour, no one has been or will be prosecuted under Strike Force Nuralda,’ the police told The Daily Telegraph.

The police this week revealed they would work together with NRL clubs to ensure vulnerable players were not exploited by crime figures. 

Senior police will meet with the CEO of every NRL club in coming months to discuss strategies to deploy in order to reduce risk to players, the publication revealed.

Senior police will meet with the CEO of every NRL club in the next few months to discuss strategies to deploy in order to reduce risk to players, the publication revealed (Southern Cross Group Stadium) 

Senior police will meet with the CEO of every NRL club in the next few months to discuss strategies to deploy in order to reduce risk to players, the publication revealed (Southern Cross Group Stadium) 

‘While detectives have not preferred criminal charges relating to these issues, their investigation highlights activities and practices that are deemed as high-risk for the NRL,’ a police statement said.

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg said the results of the investigation should give people confidence in the integrity of the sport.

‘It is reassuring to know that, after the most exhaustive police investigation, there is no evidence of match fixing in the NRL,’ he said.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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