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Old age ‘officially’ starts at 61… and just thinking about it makes Brits stressed, survey finds 

You turn ‘old’ at the age of 61, according to survey of thousands of Britons

  • Survey of 2,000 Britons found the point at which we think we’re ‘past it’ is age 61
  • Chief concerns among those polled were over their health and financial security
  • Poll commissioned by LetsGetChecked for Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

While many think age is just a number, one poll has put a figure on when you’re ‘officially’ old – and you may not like the answer.

The survey of 2,000 Britons pinpointed the point at which we think we’re ‘past it’ at 61. It also found that three-quarters of us worry about ageing, and half say it makes us feel stressed.

But it isn’t grey hair, wrinkles and hair loss which most concern us. While we are worried about putting on weight and looking less attractive as we get on in years, by far the biggest fears are over health and money.

A survey of 2,000 Britons pinpointed the point at which we think we’re ‘past it’ at 61. It also found that three-quarters of us worry about ageing, and half say it makes us feel stressed (stock photo)

Overall health was the chief concern among those polled, followed by not being able to take care of themselves, and losing their independence and financial security.

Despite this, just 39 per cent take steps to prepare for ageing, with half admitting they are not saving for retirement.

Of those who are, the average respondent puts away 13 per cent of their monthly income. For those not dealing with the issues around ageing and retiring, 26 per cent just put it down to dilly-dallying.

Overall health was the chief concern among those polled, followed by not being able to take care of themselves, and losing their independence and financial security (stock photo)

Overall health was the chief concern among those polled, followed by not being able to take care of themselves, and losing their independence and financial security (stock photo)

Almost one in five admitted they don’t feel old enough or are dreading having to take care of things. And just 44 per cent feel knowledgeable about when they should start being screened for health issues.

On average, respondents believed testing for breast cancer should begin at 34 – 16 years younger than when screening is offered to women on the NHS. The average adult also believed people start to be tested for bowel cancer at 39 rather than the recommended age of 55.

Robert Mordkin, of home health testing firm LetsGetChecked, which commissioned the study as part of Bowel Cancer Awareness Month, said: ‘We understand not everyone has access to a doctor, particularly at the moment when social distancing is so important, which is where home health testing comes into play.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk