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Parents told to play ‘no tears’ games with ‘no winners’ at child parties

Parents are being told to play ‘no tears’ games at their kids’ birthday parties so that everyone can win – a move slammed by an adolescent psychologist.  

Zoe Armstrong, a Queensland mother who was planning her daughter’s second birthday party, received an email from Huggies which listed party games where no-one loses.

She says the nappy brand is ‘feeding into the phenomenon of all kids needing to be winners’ after listing alternative guidelines to classic games including musical chairs, musical statues, Simon Says, and pass the parcel. 

Parents are being told to play ‘no tears’ games at their kids’ birthday parties (stock picture)

Queensland mother Zoe Armstrong was preparing for her daughter turning two when she received an email from Huggies which outlined 'no tears' alternatives (pictured is a social media response to the 'no tears' options )

Queensland mother Zoe Armstrong was preparing for her daughter turning two when she received an email from Huggies which outlined ‘no tears’ alternatives (pictured is a social media response to the ‘no tears’ options )

The list included revised versions of games like musical chairs, statues, Simon Says and pass the parcel (pictured is a social media response to the 'no tears' options )

The list included revised versions of games like musical chairs, statues, Simon Says and pass the parcel (pictured is a social media response to the ‘no tears’ options )

‘Two years of age is exactly the age we should be teaching our kids to be humble winners and lose with grace while appreciating and enjoying each other’s participation in a game,’ she told the ABC.  

Feedback on social media saw most people were against the idea of changing games so that children didn’t have to deal with losing. 

‘No wonder the younger generations are developing a sense of entitlement. It’s not whether you win or lose,’ one woman wrote. 

Feedback on social media (pictured) saw most people were against the idea of changing games so that children didn't have to deal with losing 

Feedback on social media (pictured) saw most people were against the idea of changing games so that children didn’t have to deal with losing 

'No wonder the younger generations are developing a sense of entitlement. It's not whether you win or lose,' one woman wrote (pictured) 

‘No wonder the younger generations are developing a sense of entitlement. It’s not whether you win or lose,’ one woman wrote (pictured) 

Adolescent psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg told ABC children don't learn anything when everyone is a winner

Adolescent psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg told ABC children don’t learn anything when everyone is a winner

‘It’s a terrible idea. We need to teach kids resilience,’ another said. 

Adolescent psychologist Dr Michael Carr-Gregg told ABC children don’t learn anything when everyone is a winner.  

‘I talk about the ”wussification” of young people, and I swear to God this is one of the best examples I’ve come across,’ Dr Carr-Gregg said.

Ms Walker said the nappy brand is 'feeding into the phenomenon of all kids needing to be winners' (stock picture)

Ms Walker said the nappy brand is ‘feeding into the phenomenon of all kids needing to be winners’ (stock picture)

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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