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Quadriplegic woman claims she was left to lie in her own faeces at Austin Health hospital, Melbourne

A Quadriplegic woman left to lie in her own faeces for more than an hour in hospital, claims a nurse told her to stop complaining and refused to help her because she was tired. 

North Melbourne woman Rachel Croucher, 37, claims she was neglected after undergoing a gastroscopy, an examination of the digestive tract, at Austin Health in Heidelberg in March. 

Ms Croucher suffered severe skin irritation after she was left to lie in her own faeces for over an hour on two occasions.

The 37-year-old genealogist said she was left feeling ‘humiliated’.

Quadriplegic woman, Rachel Croucher, left to lie in her own faeces for more than an hour in hospital, claims a nurse told her to stop complaining and refused to help her

‘The nurse said she was tired and told me to stop complaining. This is why people can’t speak out about things like this, because it’s humiliating to lie in your own faeces,’ she told the Herald Sun.

Ms Croucher said she was ‘fed up’ with the Victorian health care system failing vulnerable people like herself.

‘I’ve been to hospital 54 times in 18 months for chronic vomiting… and each time I am sent home and told to manage my care in the community, but I can’t find a single GP to see me,’ she said.

‘I’ve lost 23kg in the past 12 months and I’m just so sick and tired of feeling this way.’

Austin Health spokeswoman Julie McNamara (pictured) insisted Ms Croucher was given appropriate treatment and care during her recovery at the hospital 

Austin Health spokeswoman Julie McNamara (pictured) insisted Ms Croucher was given appropriate treatment and care during her recovery at the hospital 

Ms Croucher claims she was neglected after undergoing a gastroscopy, an examination of the digestive tract, at Austin Health (pictured) in Heidelberg in March 

Ms Croucher claims she was neglected after undergoing a gastroscopy, an examination of the digestive tract, at Austin Health (pictured) in Heidelberg in March 

Ms Croucher said it was extremely difficult to find a doctor who would take her on as a patient because of her intricate care needs.

Austin Health spokeswoman Julie McNamara insisted Ms Croucher was given appropriate treatment and care at all times during her recovery and recent stay at the hospital.

She said Ms Croucher was medically assessed before she was discharged and ongoing health care and check-ups were arranged on her behalf.  

National Home Doctor Service chief medical officer Dr Umberto Russo said the importance of a GP who could monitor ongoing complex care needs could not be underestimated 

National Home Doctor Service chief medical officer Dr Umberto Russo said the importance of a GP who could monitor ongoing complex care needs could not be underestimated 

The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners chair Associate Professor Bob Davis agreed the healthcare system did not provide adequate support for people like Ms Croucher.

He said it was difficult to find an available GP who was familiar with everyone’s unique health issues. But he said it was extremely important to shop around for a GP who was suitable. 

National Home Doctor Service chief medical officer Dr Umberto Russo agreed, saying the importance of a GP who could monitor ongoing complex care needs could not be underestimated. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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