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Rajwinder Singh wanted over questioning over Toyah Coringley death may not face justice

Revealed: Shocking reason Indian fugitive wanted over the rape and murder of Toyah Cordingley may NEVER face justice

  • Indian fugitive wanted over Toyah Cordingley’s death may never face justice
  • Expert said Rajwinder Singh could stay in India because of extradition obstacle
  • Australian authorities identified him as a person of interest over October death
  • Ms Cordingley’s body was found on Wangetti Beach in Queensland last year 

Legal experts have warned an Indian fugitive wanted for questioning over the brutal rape and murder of Queensland woman Toyah Cordingley may never face justice.

Father-of-three Rajwinder Singh remains at large after the body of Ms Cordingley – who would have turned 25 today – was discovered on Wangetti Beach, north of Cairns, last October.

He is reported to be hiding in a Sikh temple in India and extradition treaty roadblocks could mean detectives might be unable to bring him back to Australia for questioning.

Father-of-three Rajwinder Singh (pictured) remains at large after the body of Ms Cordingley – who would have turned 25 today – was discovered on Wangetti Beach, north of Cairns, last October

Ms Cordingley was killed in what police said was a 'sexually motivated' murder while walking her boyfriend's dog along the Queensland beach between 2pm and 2.30pm on October 21

Ms Cordingley was killed in what police said was a ‘sexually motivated’ murder while walking her boyfriend’s dog along the Queensland beach between 2pm and 2.30pm on October 21

‘India is a notoriously difficult place to extradite people from,’ Queensland Law Society president and leading law expert Bill Potts told Courier Mail.

‘It is a very large country, with a gigantic population, and the court system is so stretched and overcrowded, there are massive delays.’ 

Ms Cordingley was killed in what police said was a ‘sexually motivated’ murder while walking her boyfriend’s dog along the Queensland beach between 2pm and 2.30pm on October 21.

Her father Troy discovered his daughter’s naked body the following morning and a police investigation was launched in a bid to track down the woman’s killer.

Singh is understood to be a person of interest and is believed to have left Australia for India the day after Ms Cordingley was killed. 

Mr Potts said authorities have yet to build a strong murder case and bring together the necessary evidence such as DNA, photographs and eyewitness accounts in order for their extradition order to be approved. 

Singh’s brother-in-law Harpreet Singh feared all the legwork might not pay off in the long run.

‘It’s hard to find an Indian in India.’

The concerns echo the case of alleged Melbourne hit-and-run driver Puneet Puneet and the 11-year-long battle to bring him to justice.

Puneet had fled to India while he was on bail after he allegedly ran over Queensland student Dean Hofstee, 19, in 2008.

Ms Cordingley's father Troy (pictured, in front of tributes laid for his daughter) discovered his daughter's naked body the following morning and a police investigation was launched in a bid to track down the woman's killer

Ms Cordingley’s father Troy (pictured, in front of tributes laid for his daughter) discovered his daughter’s naked body the following morning and a police investigation was launched in a bid to track down the woman’s killer 

Singh is understood to be a person of interest and is believed to have left Australia for India the day after Ms Cordingley was killed

Singh is understood to be a person of interest and is believed to have left Australia for India the day after Ms Cordingley was killed 

He is alleged to have been drunk and speeding at Southbank, in the Victorian capital.

Though Puneet has been fighting extradition since his 2013 arrest in his home country.

A combination of court delays and defence lawyer attempts to keep Puneet in India, have meant Australian authorities have been unsuccessful in bringing him back to the country for a proper trial.   

Despite the potential challenges ahead, a combined effort is being made to bring Singh to Australia.

Indian law enforcement agencies are cooperating with Australian Federal Police and Queensland detectives.

Singh’s relatives have also tried to locate the person of interest, outraged that he left his wife and children, who now face eviction from their Innisfail home in Far North Queensland.

Singh's brother-in-law Harpreet Singh (pictured, in an earlier interview) feared all the legwork to extradite Singh might not pay off in the long run

Singh’s brother-in-law Harpreet Singh (pictured, in an earlier interview) feared all the legwork to extradite Singh might not pay off in the long run 

Timeline of Toyah Cordingley’s murder at Wangetti beach 

12-1pm, October 21: Toyah Cordingley goes shopping at Rusty’s Markets in downtown Cairns

12.40pm: She is filmed on CCTV crossing Sheridan Street near the markets

1pm: Miss Cordingley goes to her home in Cairns, where she may have changed her clothes, before driving out at 1.30pm

1.20pm: A family of four is seen having a picnic at Wangetti beach. Police have made multiple requests for them to come forward with information.

2pm: Miss Cordingley’s 2009 blue Mistubishi Lancer with the number plate ‘TOY 146’ is seen in Clifton Beach, about half way to Wangetti

2-2.30pm: Miss Cordingley arrives at Wangetti beach and parks in the southern car park. She takes her boyfriend’s dog Jersey for a walk on the sand and is not seen alive again

10.50pm: Her family report her missing after she doesn’t return home

7.45am, October 22: Miss Cordingley’s father Troy finds her body in the sand dunes, 800m from her car, while looking for her with a search party 

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