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Real life SAS inundated with applicants ‘looking to serve for three years then leave for TV career’

Senior officer slams real life SAS applicants only applying to go on the show ‘to serve for three years then leave for a TV career’ like Ant Middleton


Ant Middleton shot to fame as a ruthless Chief Instructor on the gruelling SAS series.

And now, the real life SAS is reportedly being inundated with applicants ‘looking to serve for three years then leave for a TV career’ like the former British Special Forces solider.

According to The Mirror, some people are joining the Special Air Service because they want to become celebrities.

Following in Ant’s footsteps: Real life SAS has been inundated with applicants ‘looking to serve for three years then leave for a TV career’ like Ant Middleton (pictured)

A former senior officer said: ‘We often have the wrong type of person wanting to join.’

‘There have been some soldiers turning up for their first day of SAS selection saying that if they pass, they’ll serve for three years and then go on TV.’

‘They are joining the SAS because they want to become ­celebrities and ­millionaires.’

Looking for fame: According to The Mirror, some people are joining the Special Air Service because they want to become celebrities

Looking for fame: According to The Mirror, some people are joining the Special Air Service because they want to become celebrities

Last year, Ant reportedly earned almost $4million.

According to The Sun newspaper, the former British Special Forces solider made $3.98million in 2020.

Ant reportedly paid $797,069 in corporation tax, making him one of the most successful fitness personalities on television.

His company, Middleton Global Ltd, has $2,525,967 in assets and $823,272 in equity.

'There have been some soldiers turning up for their first day of SAS selection saying that if they pass, they'll serve for three years and then go on TV,' a former senior officer told The Mirror

‘There have been some soldiers turning up for their first day of SAS selection saying that if they pass, they’ll serve for three years and then go on TV,’ a former senior officer told The Mirror 

This is a significant increase as Ant had previously earned $711,868 and his company had $2,923 in equity.

Ant became a chief instructor on SAS Australia after previously working on SAS: Who Dares Wins in the UK.

The British star made headlines for his tough-talking antics on the Australian series.

What a pay packet! Last year, the former British Special Forces solider made $3.98million

What a pay packet! Last year, the former British Special Forces solider made $3.98million

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk