News, Culture & Society

Republicans slam Teen Vogue for ‘Marxist propaganda’

Republican politicians Dan Crenshaw, Ted Cruz and Burgess Owens have slammed Teen Vogue for publishing an op ed calling for the abolishment of private property rights and the police.

The politicians joined multiple social media users in blasting the high end fashion bible for young people over what they described as ‘Marxist propaganda’.  

‘Just wondering if anyone sees any issues with our next generation reading Marxist propaganda in popular teen magazines…?’ tweeted Texas Congressman Crenshaw.  

Texas Senator Cruz also shared the July column to his followers and asked ‘Who owns Teen Vogue?’

Owens, a Utah GOP congressional candidate, joined in on the debate replying to Cruz’s post with: ‘Who reads Teen Vogue?’

Republican politicians Dan Crenshaw, Ted Cruz and Burgess Owens have slammed Teen Vogue for publishing an op ed (pictured) calling for the abolishment of private property rights and the police

The article featured in the July edition of Teen Vogue (pictured above)

The article featured in the July edition of Teen Vogue (pictured above) 

The offending article, written by political journalist Kandist Mallett, details the mounting eviction crisis across the US after millions of Americans lost their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic and have been left with the threat of homelessness hanging over them.

Mallett writes that the pandemic has highlighted a gaping housing inequality linked to racial inequality and calls for an end to private property rights.  

‘While we’re working to abolish the police, we must also work to dismantle what the police were put here to protect: property,’ it reads.

‘What is more evident of the legacy of settler colonialism and its violence than the idea of the ownership of land? 

‘What helped shape the unequal distribution of wealth and enduring segregation of our cities quite like centuries of racist property laws?’

 

The Republican politicians joined multiple social media users in blasting the high end fashion bible for young people over what they described as 'Marxist propaganda'

The Republican politicians joined multiple social media users in blasting the high end fashion bible for young people over what they described as ‘Marxist propaganda’

Dan Crenshaw

Ted Cruz

‘Just wondering if anyone sees any issues with our next generation reading Marxist propaganda in popular teen magazines…?’ tweeted Texas Congressman Dan Crenshaw (left) while Texas Senator Ted Cruz (right) also shared the July column to his followers and asked ‘Who owns Teen Vogue?’

The article goes on to say that private property is linked to the ‘economic violence’ in communities of color. 

‘As millions of people, particularly Black and Latinx Americans, are on the verge of eviction, it is time that we look at the idea of private housing and the role it plays in maintaining economic violence in those communities.’  

The article concludes: ‘We need a housing movement based on a rejection of the construct that any one person should own this earth’s land.’  

Crenshaw hit out at the article on Twitter Thursday, mocking the publication saying it was also calling to abolish the ‘pesky police’.

‘Teen Vogue publishes op ed that says we should abolish private property rights…along with those pesky police,’ he tweeted. 

While we’re working to abolish the police, we must also work to dismantle what the police were put here to protect: property

‘Just wondering if anyone sees any issues with our next generation reading Marxist propaganda in popular teen magazines…?’   

The Republican politicians weren’t the only ones to take issue with the article.

Several social media users also hit back at Teen Vogue.

‘So Teen Vogue has skipped right over Denmark style social democracy all the way to full-throated Marxism,’ one person tweeted.

‘It’s really a shame as we all looked to them for their economic insight for so long. It’s cliche for the old to worry about the youth but come on…’

Another wrote: ‘Good grief. Why don’t you put Moloch right in the center of your logo?’ referencing the god associated with child sacrifice.

Others leveled thinly-veiled accusations of hypocrisy at the magazine with one person pointing to the magazine’s hefty price tag when it was in print circulation before moving online.  

Several other social media users also hit back at Teen Vogue over the article which called for an end to private property rights

Several other social media users also hit back at Teen Vogue over the article which called for an end to private property rights 

‘So then if property is abolished, then we can ignore this on their cover, right?’ they tweeted, alongside an image of a magazine with the $2.99 price circled.  

Another quoted the article’s calls to dismantle property and shared a link to the Condé Nast Property Instagram account which advertises luxury real-estate including sprawling mansions and beautiful homes carved out of the side of cliffs. 

Teen Vogue and several of publisher Condé Nast’s other titles are targeted at the more affluent customer.

A recent style piece aimed at Teen Vogue’s young clientele called ’24 Trendy Backpacks for Teens for the 2020 School Year’ includes a Tory Burch at Nordstrom bag for $248. 

What is more evident of the legacy of settler colonialism and its violence than the idea of the ownership of land? 

Meanwhile, Condé Nast’s popular House & Garden is dedicated to luxury interior design. 

Condé Nast also has several branded properties in several cities around the world.

This includes four Vogue Cafés in Porto, Moscow, Kiev and Riyadh, with another scheduled to open in Beijing in October.

There’s also the Vogue Restaurant in Istanbul, Vogue Lounge in Kuala Lumpur and GQ Bar in Berlin.

According to the publishing giant’s website it has a ‘vision’ to expand its portfolio further to branded residences and hotels. 

Teen Vogue and several of publisher Condé Nast's other titles are targeted at the more affluent customer. The Condé Nast Property Instagram account (pictured) advertises luxury real-estate including sprawling mansions and beautiful homes carved out of the side of cliffs

Teen Vogue and several of publisher Condé Nast’s other titles are targeted at the more affluent customer. The Condé Nast Property Instagram account (pictured) advertises luxury real-estate including sprawling mansions and beautiful homes carved out of the side of cliffs

A property on the Condé Nast Property Instagram account

The properties are aimed at people with deep pockets

The properties on Conde Nast are aimed at people with deep pockets

While the article sparked outrage from some, several social media users defended the piece and hit back at its right-wing critics.  

One person blasted Texas Senator Cruz in a reply to his tweet asking ‘Who owns Teen Vogue?’ where they questioned his focus on a teenage magazine while his state is ravaged by the coronavirus pandemic. 

‘Who owns Ted Cruz? And why is he tweeting about Teen Vogue when tens of thousands of Texans are dying and millions more are unemployed with no way to pay for rent and food?’ they tweeted.

Another mocked his tweet by replying with an explanation of the ownership of the publication. 

While the article sparked outrage from some, several social media users defended the piece and hit back at its right-wing critics

While the article sparked outrage from some, several social media users defended the piece and hit back at its right-wing critics

‘Teen Vogue is published by Condé Nast who are owned by Advance Publications, the 4th largest private company in the New York area, according to Crain’s,’ one person tweeted.

‘The company is controlled by Steven Newhouse (Chairman), Thomas Summer (CFO), and Donald Newhouse (President).’

Crenshaw also faced a backlash from some social media users who slammed his attack on the magazine.

‘Hey bucko, just to catch you up to speed, but us millenials and zoomers are kind of over a society that is all about buying up whatever you can at the expense of others,’ one person tweeted. 

We need a housing movement based on a rejection of the construct that any one person should own this earth’s land

‘It’s tiring and we want to look out for the good of society – not just ourselves.’

Another wrote: ‘I’m more concerned with the septuagenarian squatting in the White House with one hand on the red phone, getting his healthcare policies from Tucker Carlson. 

‘Why aren’t you? The readers of Teen Vogue will grow up and develop; Trump will only wither and dessicate.’

Meanwhile, another person pointed out that an op ed is a piece covering the opinion of the writer and not necessarily the wider publication. 

‘You get the idea of an Op Ed, right? It’s like free speech…differing ideas. You know, Constitutional stuff?’ they tweeted. 

‘You want to limit what our kids are exposed to create your own magazine, maybe “Teen Vague”?’      

People gather for a protest calling on New York to cancel rent outside of New York City Civil Court this week. Families across the nation have struggled to pay rent after businesses shuttered and workers were thrown into unemployment overnight when states went into lockdown to slow the spread of the virus

People gather for a protest calling on New York to cancel rent outside of New York City Civil Court this week. Families across the nation have struggled to pay rent after businesses shuttered and workers were thrown into unemployment overnight when states went into lockdown to slow the spread of the virus

Protesters have been taking to the streets calling for a ban on evictions and for rent to be canceled as widespread economic challenges and unemployment rumble on

Protesters have been taking to the streets calling for a ban on evictions and for rent to be canceled as widespread economic challenges and unemployment rumble on

The debate over the articles comes as families across the nation have struggled to pay rent after businesses shuttered and workers were thrown into unemployment overnight when states went into lockdown to slow the spread of the virus. 

Stark research global advisory firm Stout Risius Ross last month found that 40 percent of American renters were unable to pay their rent.

This figure rose even higher in the Big Apple, where 46 percent could not afford to pay rent. 

Several states issued eviction moratoriums to prevent cash-strapped families being turfed out into the streets but many feel this is not enough. 

The problem has been exacerbated further by the reality that jobless Americans are now losing out on the $600-per-week enhanced unemployment benefits from the federal government. 

Protesters have been taking to the streets calling for a ban on evictions and for rent to be canceled as widespread economic challenges and unemployment rumble on.  

Who is Karl Marx and what is his ‘The Communist Manifesto’?

Karl Marx's ideas of society, economics and politics formed the theoretical base for modern international communism

Karl Marx’s ideas of society, economics and politics formed the theoretical base for modern international communism

Described as one of the most influential figures in human history, Karl Marx is a German revolutionary, sociologist, historian, and economist in the 19th century.

Perhaps best known for his critique on capitalism, Marx’s radical ideas of society, economics and politics have been collectively understood as Marxism.

His ideas formed the theoretical base for modern international communism ideology, which aims for shared ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes.

Born in 1818, Marx studied law in Bonn and Berlin and received a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Jena.

In 1843, after a brief editor role at a liberal newspaper in Cologne, Marx and his wife Jenny von Westphalen moved to Paris, a hotbed of radical thought.  

In 1848, Marx published ‘Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei’, commonly known as ‘The Communist Manifesto’ with fellow German thinker Friedrich Engels.

It became the most celebrated pamphlet in the socialist movement, according to Encyclopaedia Britannica.

The manifesto introduced Marx and Engels’ concept of socialism as a natural result of the conflicts inherent in the capitalist system.

It states that the whole history of mankind has been a history of class struggles, contests between exploiting and exploited, ruling and oppressed classes.

Marx asserted that these would ultimately disappear with the victory of the proletarians – the industrial working class.

It closed with the words: ‘The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Workingmen of all countries, unite!’

Marx actively pressed for its implementation, arguing that the working class should carry out organised revolutionary action to topple capitalism and bring about socio-economic emancipation.

Revolution subsequently erupted in France, Italy and Austria in the first months of 1848.

In June 1849, Marx moved to London and would remain based in the city for the rest of his life.

Marx also was the author of the movement’s most important book, ‘Das Kapital’, where in the first volume, Marx aimed to reveal the economic patterns underpinning the capitalist mode of production. 

Although Marx did not live to publish the second and third parts, they were completed and published by Engels.

Marx died on March 14, 1883 and was buried at Highgate Cemetery in London.

In China and the Soviet Union, Marxism is enshrined as a ‘guiding ideology’ in the constitutions of both the party and the state.

The founding and ruling political party of modern China – the Communist Party – requires members to adopt the reading of Marxist works and the understanding of Marxist theories as a ‘way of life’ and a ‘spiritual pursuit’.

In many Chinese universities, an ‘introduction to the basic principles of Marxism’ is a mandatory course all students must pass to graduate.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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