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Rise of the OAG (old-age gamer!): 85% of over-65s now play video games at least once a WEEK

Rise of the OAG (old-age gamer!): 85% of over-65s now play video games at least once a WEEK, report claims

  • Samsung UK surveyed 1,000 over-65s who are interested in gaming
  • The majority played games weekly, with 36 per cent playing every day
  • Almost a fifth said they picked it up during the pandemic, and haven’t stopped

It’s not just the teenagers that have to be told to get off the Xbox for dinner anymore – and this new gaming generation may need you to shout even louder.

New research has shown that 85 per cent of people over 65 play video games at least once a week, while 36 per cent play every day.

Many of these grandparent gamers say that they first picked up the console during the COVID-19 lockdowns, and now use them regularly to keep their mind active.

Studies have shown that games can boost the brainpower of the elderly and stave off dementia.

New research has shown that 85 per cent of people over 65 play video games at least once a week, and 36 per cent of them play every day (stock image)

PLAYING VIDEO GAMES CAN IMPROVE YOUR READING SKILLS

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan say that gaming may improve peripheral attention skills, which are essential for reading ability.

Many video games involve the player reacting to objects placed peripherally, rather than in the centre of the screen.

The team conducted a study that tested the reading ability of a group of people with different levels of experience playing video games.

The results revealed that participants who had played games with more peripheral objects were better at reading both known words and fake words they had to ‘sound out’.

According to the new research, 42 per cent of elderly gamers do so to bond and spend time with family members of all ages.

While 51 per cent like to play by themselves, 42 per cent enjoy playing with – or against – their children or grandchildren, and 44 per cent with their partner.

This is especially the case during the winter when many seniors find it more difficult to leave the house and meet up face-to-face.

But they aren’t just motivated by their relatives, as a quarter revealed they play to keep their brain engaged.

Certain brain training games have been proven to help elderly people perform better at everyday tasks and improve their driving.

Over a fifth say that a session on the PlayStation or Xbox helps boost their mood, while 23 per cent find it ‘calming’ as it ‘takes their mind off the busy world’.

The research was conducted by Samsung UK, who surveyed 1,000 UK adults aged 65 and over who either have played, or would be interested in playing, computer or video games.

Almost a fifth of gamers surveyed said that they picked up the hobby during the pandemic, and haven’t wanted to stop since.

While 51 per cent like to play by themselves, 42 per cent of elderly gamers enjoy playing with - or against - their children or grandchildren (stock image)

While 51 per cent like to play by themselves, 42 per cent of elderly gamers enjoy playing with – or against – their children or grandchildren (stock image)

Graeme Little, Head of Display at Samsung Electronics UK, said: ‘The power of connection that technology can bring was evident during the pandemic, and it’s incredible to see the older generation embracing the virtual world and continuing new habits formed over the past few years.’

Of those who were interested in getting into video games, but had not yet done so, 32 per cent said this was because of ‘not understanding the technology’.

Another 31 per cent said they were still ‘needing someone to explain how to play’, and 29 per cent said they did not think they had the correct equipment to do so.

Grandad Frank, a 77-year-old TikTok sensation with over seven million followers, has teamed up with Samsung to learn how to game for the very first time.

Grandad Frank, a 77-year-old TikTok sensation with over seven million followers, has teamed up with Samsung to learn how to game from Twitch and YouTube gaming star Gee Nelly

Grandad Frank, a 77-year-old TikTok sensation with over seven million followers, has teamed up with Samsung to learn how to game from Twitch and YouTube gaming star Gee Nelly

He is being taught by Twitch and YouTube gaming star Gee Nelly, and hopes to inspire other older people to join him. 

He said: ‘It was during the pandemic that I started creating videos on TikTok with my granddaughter, Kiera, and since then we’ve been closer than ever. 

‘Embracing the digital world, with the help of my family, has been so much fun over the last few years and has certainly kept us all laughing.

‘That’s why I’ve teamed up with Samsung to help other older people out there get online, whether it’s playing a video game with your grandchildren or doing a silly TikTok dance. 

‘You’ll be amazed by the connection it can bring – I feel like I’m having a second childhood!’

@grandadfrankk

#AD It’s never too late to learn a new skill and guess what I’m doing this week? That’s right! As one of my resolutions for 2023 I’m looking to find new ways to keep connected with my family. I’ve teamed up with Samsung UK and @Gee Nelly to learn how to be a real gamer with help from the amazing Samsung Odyssey Ark Monitor, with cloud gaming so I can easily pick up where I left off, whether that’s on my mobile or my monitor. See how I get on as a new recruit of the ‘OAGs’ (Old Age Gamers to you and I!) and perhaps you may be inspired to have a go with family and friends this year? 🎮📱 #OdysseyArk #GamingSetUp #SamsungUK

♬ original sound – Grandad Frank

People aged 95 and OVER regularly engage in ‘small acts of resistance’ to maintain a sense of control 

Forget teenage rebels – people over the age of 95 regularly engage in ‘small acts of resistance and subversion’ to keep some sense of control, a new study has found.

Researchers from the University of York and Newcastle University interviewed a group of people in their late 90s to see what the key elements were to sustain a positive outlook on life.

Overall, elderly people were happy and content with life during their old age. This was influenced remembering past successes, controlling their healthcare needs and appearing ‘outwardly presentable’.

The most important factor in keeping older people cheery, however, was holding onto their independence – even if this meant rebelling against those trying to help them.

Read more here 

 



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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



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