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Russian accountant dies instantly after dropping her phone into the bath while it was charging

A Russian accountant has died after she dropped her mobile phone into the bath while it was charging.

Evgenia Shulyatyeva, 26, was found dead in the bathtub of her home in Kirovo-Chepetsk, around 500 miles from Moscow, by 53-year-old mother Vera who rushed to the apartment after she was unable to call her daughter.

Investigators say she was ‘killed instantly’ by electrocution after the phone ‘slipped’ and landed in the water with her.  

Evgenia Shulyatyeva, 26, was found dead in the bathtub of her home in Kirovo-Chepetsk, around 500 miles from Moscow, with her phone in the water

Investigators say Miss Shulyatyeva died instantly from electrocution when the phone slipped and fell into the bath with her

Investigators say Miss Shulyatyeva died instantly from electrocution when the phone slipped and fell into the bath with her

The Russian Investigative Committee is now examining the incident, say reports.

Evgenia is the eighth Russian known to have been killed after dropping a charging phone into the bath with them, despite repeated government warnings. 

It was not clear if Evgenia was using the device at the moment of the accident. 

Her funeral was due to take place Wednesday. 

Friend Elena Shakleina posted: ‘Sister… rest in peace…. sleep well ….. you are forever in our hearts …’

‘Call me tomorrow, say that was a just a dream, that this is not the truth.’

Another friend Anyuta Buyanova wrote: ‘You were so bright …Sleep well….’ 

In August an unnamed ten-year-old schoolgirl dropped her phone in the bath at her home in Serov. It was plugged into the mains.

In July, a 17-year-old youth was electrocuted after listening to music while having a bath on his charging mobile.

The accountant's body was found by mother Vera, 53 (pictured), who rushed to her daughter's home after she failed to answer a phone call

The accountant’s body was found by mother Vera, 53 (pictured), who rushed to her daughter’s home after she failed to answer a phone call

In June, Liliya Novikova – an internationally recognised poker star – suffered a suspected massive electric shock in her bathroom.

A mathematics prodigy with a first class degree in engineering from a top Russian university, the 26-year-old was home alone when she died.

In April supermarket worker Anastasia, 20, was also found dead by her grief-stricken mother while holding the phone in her bath.

She had been electrocuted.

‘I saw Nastya (Anastasia) lying in an empty bath,’ said her mother Oksana, 48.

‘In one hand she was holding her mobile phone plugged into the socket, and in the other she had a bath plug.’

A week earlier Yulia Vysotskaya, 14, from Cheboksary, died when her phone which slipped out of her hands in the bath.

Her devastated parents ‘called an ambulance but paramedics were only able to register the schoolgirl’s death and take her body to the morgue,’ said one report.

In December, Russian martial arts champion Irina Rybnikova, 15, died instantly while using an iPhone plugged into a charger while in the bath at home in Bratsk, Siberia.

The Russian Investigative Committee has been called to examine the death, and say it is not clear whether Miss Shulyatyeva was using her phone at the time she died

The Russian Investigative Committee has been called to examine the death, and say it is not clear whether Miss Shulyatyeva was using her phone at the time she died

Earlier, a 12-year-old girl named Kseniya P was electrocuted while listening to music from her charging phone while in the bath in Bolshoe Gryzlovo village in the Serpukhovsky district of Moscow region.

Her mother was cooking an evening meal and become worried about Kseniya’s silence. She went into the bathroom and found the girl ‘already dead with her head under the water’.

The phone was floating in the bath.

Electronics engineer Andrey Stanovsky has warned that ‘relaxing in a bathroom with your mobile phone plugged is like playing Russian roulette’.

After Irina’s death, Yury Agrafonov, the head of radio-electronic department of Irkutsk State University, said: ‘Water is a good conductor….

‘This is why there was a short circuit when the phone fell into the water.

‘If the phone had not been plugged in to 220 volts, the tragedy would not have happened.’

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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