News, Culture & Society

Russian woman with 152 metal objects in her stomach

  • Elderly woman admitted to hospital in Ulan-Ude, southeast Russia
  • Surgeons found 152 metal objects in her stomach, including nails and bolts
  • The 74-year-old said she was aneamic and thought eating metal would help

An elderly Russian woman has had to have 152 metal objects including nails from her stomach after eating them in a belief it would improve her iron levels. 

The 74-year-old, only known as Nina, had been admitted to hospital in Ulan-Ude, some 145miles north of the Mongolian border in south-east Russia.

She came in complaining of a high temperature, but medical staff were shocked when they discovered the cause of her illness on X-rays.

Iron stomach: An X-ray revealed the shocking amount of metal in the 74-year-old’s stomach

Surgeons found more than 152 ‘alien objects’ inside the pensions.

This included long nails, large screws, bolts, a door catch and scrap metal – some six inches – in length.

The elderly woman had also at one point swallowed a valuable silver necklace. 

The 74-year-old told doctors she anaemic and believed eating metal objects would help her with her iron levels.

Operation: Surgeons pulled out nails, screws, scrap metal and a silver necklace from the elderly woman's stomach

Operation: Surgeons pulled out nails, screws, scrap metal and a silver necklace from the elderly woman’s stomach

The 74-year-old woman told doctor that she had been anaemic and thought eating metal object would improve her iron levels

The 74-year-old woman told doctor that she had been anaemic and thought eating metal object would improve her iron levels

Medical staff told local news that the woman said she started eating metal some 14 years ago.

‘No-one apart from her knows how long these objects have been inside her,’ said a source at the Semashko Republic Regional Hospital.

Doctors said there were no serious injuries to her stomach or throat.

The source added: ‘There is no threat to her life.’ The woman is under surveillance in hospital. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk