News, Culture & Society

Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary says plane passengers may have to wear face masks until 2022

Ryanair passengers could be forced to wear face masks into next year, its boss today revealed.

The budget airline has ramped up its summer flight schedule with 2,300 flights set to run every day, chief executive Michael O’Leary said.

It will run at about 80 per cent of its usual capacity to keep up with demand from Britons desperate to get back to European beaches.

However, beachgoers will need to remember to pack their face masks alongside their swimwear, Mr O’Leary warned.

The company has taken a massive hit over the last year, carrying only around 33 million passengers in the year to February, compared to 154 million in the same period a year earlier.

Last month the Irish low-cost carrier announced expected losses of £800million across 2021. 

Ryanair has ramped up its summer flight schedule with 2,300 flights set to run every day, chief executive Michael O’Leary (pictured) said

The company has taken a massive hit over the last year, carrying only around 33 million passengers in the year to February, compared to 154 million in the same period a year earlier

The company has taken a massive hit over the last year, carrying only around 33 million passengers in the year to February, compared to 154 million in the same period a year earlier

Ryanair expects to lose £800million this year

With Covid continuing to ‘wreak havoc across the industry’, Ryanair bosses are ‘cautiously guiding’ a net loss of between £750million and £838million.

However, the airline said it would be in a position where it could ‘capitalise on the many growth opportunities’ after the pandemic, ‘especially where competitor airlines have substantially cut capacity or failed’.  

Last month the company announced third-quarter losses of £270million on Monday.

Bosses added that in the three months to December, 8.1 million passengers used Ryanair, compared to 35.9 million in the same quarter in 2019.

The loss for the quarter contrasts with an £78 million profit after tax in the same period a year before.

The company said: ‘FY21 will continue to be the most challenging year in Ryanair’s 35 year history.

‘Recently announced Covid lockdowns and travel restrictions across the EU & UK will reduce forecast FY21 traffic to between 26m and 30m (previously ‘up to 35m’), with more risk towards the lower end of the range.

‘While Q4 visibility remains limited due to uncertain and constantly changing Covid-19 travel restrictions, European government lockdowns, the timing of the rollout of vaccines across the EU and a very close-in booking curve, we are cautiously guiding an FY21 net loss (pre-exceptional items) of between 850m euros (£750m) and 950m euros (£838m).’ 

Mr O’Leary said: ‘I would imagine at this point in time, we’re planning to continue to require mandatory face mask wearing on board our aircraft through the remainder of this summer schedule and next winter’s schedule.’ 

He added that the use of masks could continue until the spring of next year, unless there are new guidelines from European authorities.

Mr O’Leary is keen to get his planes back in the air so Ryanair can start making money and selling tickets again.  

Airlines are now hoping that vaccination efforts can allow a return to fairly normal holiday plans this summer, with European destinations primarily back on the cards.

‘Families will be travelling to and from the UK, to and from Europe, going to the beaches of Europe on summer holidays that are richly deserved after the very fraught last 12 months,’ Mr O’Leary said.

‘I’m pleased to report that we’ve had a recent surge in bookings, as the UK began to open up restrictions also, two weeks ago when Germany eased their restrictions on travel … we’ve seen a significant surge in bookings,’ he said.

Mr O’Leary added that the airline could survive another lost summer of travel – but he didn’t see any reason for this to happen.

He said: ‘If you’re fully vaccinated, frankly, I would be very surprised if there was any legal basis for the UK Government preventing people travelling on holidays to other European countries, which will have caught up with the UK vaccine rollout programme by the end of May or the end of June.’

Ryanair currently asks all passengers to wear a face mask on board and threatens those who refuse with removal from the aircraft.

A note on its website reads: ‘We may refuse to carry you or your baggage on any flights operated by an airline of the Ryanair Group, if carrying you or your baggage may affect the safety, health or acceptable comfort of other passengers or crew members. 

‘In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, this is especially the case if you refuse to undergo temperature checks at the airport or if you refuse to wear a face mask during boarding or on-board our aircraft. 

Holidaymakers are pictured enjoying a day at the Nord Beach in Gandia, near Valencia, on July 1 last summer

Holidaymakers are pictured enjoying a day at the Nord Beach in Gandia, near Valencia, on July 1 last summer

‘Some countries require passengers to wear surgical face masks at the airport and on-board the aircraft. 

‘It is each passenger’s responsibility to check local requirements before travelling. 

Ryanair’s rules for wearing masks on-board its planes 

Ryanair asks all passengers to wear a face mask on board – and threatens those who refuse with removal from the aircraft.

A note on its website reads: ‘We may refuse to carry you or your baggage on any flights operated by an airline of the Ryanair Group, if carrying you or your baggage may affect the safety, health or acceptable comfort of other passengers or crew members. 

‘In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, this is especially the case if you refuse to undergo temperature checks at the airport or if you refuse to wear a face mask during boarding or on-board our aircraft. 

‘Some countries require passengers to wear surgical face masks at the airport and on-board the aircraft. 

‘It is each passenger’s responsibility to check local requirements before travelling. 

‘Children under 12 do not need to wear face masks. If you suffer from a medical condition that prevents you from wearing a face mask you are exempted from the face mask obligation on provision of a medical certificate attesting your condition.’

Source: Ryanair 

‘Children under 12 do not need to wear face masks. If you suffer from a medical condition that prevents you from wearing a face mask you are exempted from the face mask obligation on provision of a medical certificate attesting your condition.’

It comes as leading scientific adviser Neil Ferguson, dubbed Professor Lockdown after warning ministers to close the country last March, warned Britons could face another summer at home as coronavirus variants rip across Europe.

The Imperial College London epidemiologist said ‘travel may be one of the later things to be relaxed’.

He said he believes life will not be back to normal by summer ‘but by the autumn it will feel a lot more normal’.

He said he was concerned over the South African variant of the virus on the Bloc, which reduces the effect of vaccines.

That and the Brazilian variant reportedly make up 40 per cent of infections in several French regions.

Meanwhile, Boris Johnson faces growing calls from his top scientists to insulate Britain from the new strains by strengthening border controls.

England’s chief medical officer Prof Chris Whitty and his deputy Prof Jonathan Van-Tam are said to be pushing for the red list of high-risk countries to be expanded.

Professor Ferguson said today that depending what happens in other countries, ‘travel may be one of the later things to be relaxed’.

He told BBC Breakfast: ‘I think we… whilst not everything will be back to normal by the summer, certainly by the autumn, it will feel a lot more normal.’

He said he believes the UK’s reopening road map is still on track despite concerns over the third wave in Europe.

He said the surge there has ‘already happened to us and we’re through to the other side’.

He continued: ‘But the real concern is things like the South African variant, where the vaccination programme we’re currently using, whilst it would still give some protection against that (variant), the protection would be reduced’.

Priti Patel this morning did not rule out tightening measures at the border, including keeping controls in place over the summer in a fresh blow for foreign holidays (Ibiza pictured)

Priti Patel this morning did not rule out tightening measures at the border, including keeping controls in place over the summer in a fresh blow for foreign holidays (Ibiza pictured)

The UK has ‘rolled out vaccination very fast and so we are in a very different position from most European countries’, he added.

‘We have vaccinated more than twice the proportion of the population than any other European country has done, so we’re in a better place from that point of view.

‘I don’t think, just because cases are rising in Europe, that necessarily throws our timetable into doubt.

‘What it may do is affect planning around restrictions on international travel, how much we try and screen people coming into the country.’

On keeping to the road map, he added the UK has a ‘very good chance of both being able to relax measures and not needing to tighten up’.

Boris Johnson is facing growing calls from his top scientists to insulate Britain from emerging variants by strengthening border controls (Heathrow pictured)

Boris Johnson is facing growing calls from his top scientists to insulate Britain from emerging variants by strengthening border controls (Heathrow pictured)

France is of particular concern because it has a lot of mutant strains but the majority crossing the Channel, such as lorry drivers, are exempt from quarantine.

Government scientists have reportedly told ministers South African and Brazilian variants make up 40 per cent of infections in several French regions.

These variants are driving a third wave across Europe and causing leaders to plunge populations back into lockdowns.

While scientists are confident these mutations will still be somewhat susceptible to vaccines, they could be more resistant and also drive up cases.

Priti Patel this morning did not rule out tightening measures at the border, including keeping controls in place over the summer in a fresh blow for foreign holidays.

Some increasingly view forfeiting summer holidays as a sacrifice to plough ahead with the roadmap to lifting lockdown.

The Home Secretary said: ‘We rule nothing out in terms of the approach we take when it comes to infection control and the safety and security of our public from this virus.’

Her comments came after Prof Van-Tam held a briefing with MPs last night about the pandemic.

An MP on the call told The Times: ‘Anyone on that call would understand that he thinks the red list needs expanding.’ 

The Home Secretary said: 'We rule nothing out in terms of the approach we take when it comes to infection control and the safety and security of our public from this virus'

The Home Secretary said: ‘We rule nothing out in terms of the approach we take when it comes to infection control and the safety and security of our public from this virus’

England's chief medical officer Prof Chris Whitty (pictured) and his deputy Prof Jonathan Van-Tam are said to be pushing for the red list of high-risk countries to be expanded

England’s chief medical officer Prof Chris Whitty (pictured) and his deputy Prof Jonathan Van-Tam are said to be pushing for the red list of high-risk countries to be expanded

Despairing Britons blast BA and easyJet as airlines axe flights this summer

Hopes for summer foreign holidays have been dealt a fresh blow after British Airways and easyJet scrapped more flights.

Would-be passengers were left dismayed by the latest round of cancellations – that included trips booked for after May 17, when breaks abroad were scheduled to resume. Some have even had flights for September axed.

Bradley Crouch, 33, bought flights to Mykonos on May 23 for a post-pandemic getaway with his extended family, confident it would go ahead after of Boris Johnson announced the roadmap to exit lockdown. ‘It’s that needed trip we’ve all been waiting for for so long,’ the gutted business owner from Kent told MailOnline after easyJet cancelled his flights last week.

Bradley Crouch on a family holiday to Tenerife in 2018 with his wife Katerina and daughter Iliana. His trip to Mykonos in May has been cancelled

Bradley Crouch on a family holiday to Tenerife in 2018 with his wife Katerina and daughter Iliana. His trip to Mykonos in May has been cancelled

Ministers announced that from Monday rule-breakers in England travelling overseas illegally will face a £5,000 fine. Critics railed against the ‘draconian measure’ and argued it would inflict further pain on the hard-hit travel sector. The Health Secretary suggested the tough rules could be eased on May 17 – but cautioned it was still too early to give summer holidays the green light. 

British Airways insists its cancellations were not due to the evolving situation on the Continent but a routine review of flights to reflect the view of IATA, the airline trade body, that foreign travel will not resume to pre-pandemic levels by 2023.

The pared-back routes include fewer flights to Italy, the Netherlands, Germany and Sweden, and extend as far into the future as August. Sources played down the flight cuts as ‘business as usual’ – and suggested more could be added in the future if there is scope. Yet would-be holidaymakers were exasperated that flights they had booked for after lockdown were being axed. One said: ‘I’m getting welcome back emails so booked flights in good faith having had my first vaccine dose.

‘Yesterday two were cancelled for mid July. Today, another cancelled for mid August. This is absolutely ridiculous, you either want passengers back or you don’t!’ Nick Murrell tweeted: ‘Book with confidence you tell us British Airways. Budapest and Milan flights in September cancelled in 24 hours. What’s the point in booking with you?’

British Airways said: ‘We are sorry that, like other airlines, due to the current coronavirus pandemic and global travel restrictions we are operating a reduced and dynamic schedule.’ EasyJet also stressed they have not cancelled flights for fear of a European third wave but that the flight schedule is reviewed ‘on an ongoing basis to align our flying programme with customer demand and government travel restrictions’.  

They added that France was the main cause for concern, but Germany was also setting alarm bells ringing. 

The red list – currently numbering 35 countries – is a travel ban except for British nationals who must undergo 10 days mandatory isolation in a hotel.

Arrivals from non red-list countries, such as France, are also required to quarantine but can do so from home.

However, around 68 per cent of French arrivals are hauliers who are exempt. 

Tory MPs are also concerned the border is too permeable, with one backbencher telling MailOnline measures should be toughened to prevent infection spreading.

This morning Ms Patel said: ‘It’s not for me to speculate what will happen in the summer. 

‘We have a roadmap, we have a plan and we are sticking to that plan and rightly so, because we want to ensure that we safeguard the rollout of the vaccine programme. 

‘As I’ve said the advice right now is not to travel, and we have to see how other variants are developing. 

‘We will take all measures basically to protect our country and our citizens from new variants.’

She also told The Sun: ‘Of course I haven’t booked a summer holiday’ told Britons to hold off making plans just yet.

Holidaymakers were dismayed yesterday when airlines including BA and easyJet scrapped more flights this summer.  

The Government will publish a review into the viability of international travel next month, but last night the Prime Minister appeared doubtful of summer holidays.

He told the No10 press briefing: ‘We’ve heard already that there are other European countries where the disease is now rising so things certainly look difficult for the time being.’ 

Just over 10 per cent of adults have received their first vaccine dose across the EU, compared to the UK’s figure exceeding 53 per cent. 

The rapid build of infections on the Continent has spurred leaders to reimpose strict lockdown.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that all non-essential shops will be closed over the Easter period with church services moved online and public gatherings banned as infections rise ‘exponentially’. 

France’s hospital federation chief warned that case figures are ‘exploding’ and the health system is heading for an ‘unprecedented violent shock’ in about three weeks unless strong action is taken. 

Prime Minister Jean Castex imposed tough measures on 16 French regions including the cities of Paris, Lille and Nice last week.

And in Spain, experts have begun warning of a fourth wave of Covid after deaths from the virus rose to 633 on Monday compared to 298 a week ago.

From Monday people in England caught travelling overseas without an acceptable excuse, such as essential work, face a £5,000 fine.

Professor Neil Ferguson, whose modelling prompted the first national lockdown a year ago today, urged Britons to book holidays in the UK.

He told BBC Radio 4’s World at One yesterday: ‘I certainly am in favour of relaxing border measures at a slower rate than we relax controls within the country and doing all we can to reduce the risk of importation of variants, which might undermine our vaccination programme. 

‘I think we should be planning on summer holidays in the UK, not overseas.’

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesman said: ‘We have strong measures in place at the border and the vast majority of people coming into this country must quarantine and take two mandatory PCR tests – on day 2 and day 8 of their 10-day isolation period, as well as proving they have tested negative before travel.

‘Specific and limited exemptions are only in place where necessary, for example to allow for food, medicines and other products to be delivered into the UK.

‘We are carefully monitoring the increase in cases in Europe and will keep all measures under review as we cautiously remove restrictions.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk