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Salmon in Miso Broth with Black Rice and Braised Greens

Salmon in Miso Broth with Black Rice and Braised Greens

ENERGY 453kcals PROTEIN 33g FAT 21g SATURATED FAT 3.7g CARBOHYDRATE 36g TOTAL SUGARS 3.2g SALT 1.1g SODIUM 432mg FIBRE 5g

Often rice or other grains, left to ferment. Black rice is worth seeking out for its texture, flavour and nutritional value: it has antioxidant pigments, is high in heart-healthy polyphenols and has more fibre and protein than white rice. But it takes ages to cook and can be expensive, so cook ahead and keep some in the freezer. Or try brown or red rice.

Serves 2

PREPARATION TIME 10 minutes

COOKING TIME 50 minutes

75g black rice

80g sprouting broccoli (thicker stalks thinly sliced lengthways)

80g sugar snap peas or mangetout

80g pak choi, finely shredded

250g salmon fillets, skinned, boned and cut into 3cm cubes

1 tbsp white miso paste

chives or a sprinkling of dried seaweed flakes, to serve

  •  To cook the rice, bring 600ml of water to the boil in a small pan. Add the black rice, reduce the heat then simmer gently for about 40 minutes until the rice is tender (it has a unique, firm texture, so it won’t be soft). Half cover the pan during cooking and check regularly in case it spills over or needs more water.
  •  Heat 300ml of water in a large pan. Add the sprouting broccoli to the pan to simmer for 1 minute, then add the sugar snap peas or mangetout and the pak choi. Add the salmon and poach gently in the broth for 3-4 minutes or until just flaking. Keep the heat low, to simmer. The trick is to keep the cooking brief, the veg crunchy and not overcook the fish.
  •  Remove from the heat and whisk the miso paste into the hot but not boiling water, salmon and veg. The rice should have absorbed most of its water, so to serve, just spoon it between two large soup bowls. Ladle the broth, salmon and greens on to the rice and snip some chives or seaweed over the top.

Nutrition Tip

Miso is high in salt but also protein- and nutrient-rich. Its colour, from creamy white to dark brown, signifies its intensity and saltiness. White miso is the mildest. Add it last with the pan off the heat to preserve the beneficial bacteria (probiotics). 

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